Event Archive

Humanities Faculty Celebration

Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 4:00pm

Rula Bula Irish Pub, 401 S. Mill Ave Tempe, AZ

The Institute for Humanities Research is partnering with the Humanities Units on the Tempe campus (English, SHPRS and SILC) to celebrate faculty research accomplishments! Join us for a celebratory social gathering at Rúla Búla, 4:00-6:00 p.m., Thursday November 30. Appetizers will be provided. Beverages will be available for purchase.

We hope you will join us to celebrate the humanities at ASU! 

The IHR Humanities Forum: Humanities in and for the Valley

Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - 12:00pm

RBH 196, 1102 S. McAllister Ave. Tempe, AZ 85281

We are very pleased to have Brenda Thomson, Executive Director of Arizona Humanities, as our distinguished guest to help us launch the new IHR Humanities Forum. Come hear Thomson talk about current collaborations between ASU and other cultural and civic institutions, as well as wider communities in Arizona. How can ASU help create opportunities for humanities engagement and what are best practices for doing so?

Bring your lunch, your questions and your experiences.

Nexus Possibility Lunch: The Possible Worlds of HASTAC Scholars

Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 12:00pm

RBH 191/197, 1102 S. McAllister Ave. Tempe, AZ 85281

Please join us for our November Possibility Lunch, "The Possible Worlds of HASTAC Scholars."

HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory) is an interdisciplinary community of humanists, artists, social scientists, scientists, and technologists that are changing the way we teach and learn. Their members and affiliate organizations share news, tools, research, insights, pedagogy, methods, and projects—including Digital Humanities and other born-digital scholarship—and collaborate on various HASTAC initiatives.

Histories of Resistance and Rebellion

Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 12:00pm

RBH 196, 1102 S. McAllister Ave. Tempe, AZ 85281

Islam and the French Revolution

Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 12:00pm

RBH 171, 1102 S. McAllister Ave. Tempe, AZ 85281

Dr. Coller, author of Arab France: Islam and the Making of Modern Europe 1789-1831 (2010) will talk to us about his new project on Islam and the French Revolution. Dr. Coller will discuss the methodological challenges of doing what he calls a “global microhistory,” including how to find the intersections between representations of Muslims and the actual trajectories of Muslim lives and societies in the revolutionary period, and in particular Muslim presence and invisibility in cities.

Humanities at Work: Counting the Dead, Arizona and the Forgotten Pandemic

Tuesday, November 7, 2017 - 12:00pm

Hayden Library, C6A

The influenza pandemic killed more people between 1918 and 1920 than were collectively killed in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and Vietnam, yet it’s known as the “forgotten pandemic.” Early twentieth-century reports put global mortality at 21.5 million, but more recent estimates suggest as many as 50 million, a number which may be "as much as 100 percent understated" (Johnson and Mueller, 2002).

Book Award and Humanities Authors' Reception

Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 4:30pm

University Club, Thoren and Traditions Room

Please join us for the annual Humanities Faculty Authors Reception, hosted by the Institute for Humanities Research and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This event recognizes and celebrates humanities faculty authors from Arizona State University and the substantial body of humanistic research reflected in their publications.

We will honor the winner of the 2017 IHR Transdisciplinary Book Award, Charles T. Lee and his book Ingenious Citizenship: Recrafting Democracy for Social Change.

Emmett Till, Three Murder Sites, and the Spatial Politics of Remembrance

Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - 3:00pm

Ross Blakley Hall 1102 S McAllister Ave RBH 117 Tempe, Arizona 85281

Please join us for David Tell's talk, "Emmett Till, Three Murder Sites, and the Spatial Politics of Remembrance," sponsored by ASU's Department of English, the Institute for Humanities Research, and the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy.

The Emmett Till Memory Project

Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - 12:00pm

Ross Blakley Hall 1102 S McAllister Ave RBH 196 Tempe, Arizona 85281

Bring a lunch and join us for David Tell's talk "The Emmett Till Memory Project," which will focus on the collaborative nature of interdisciplinary digital humanities work. Co-sponsored by the IHR's Nexus Lab and the Department of English, this talk will reveal insights about the design and execution of the Emmett Till Memory Project app.

Nexus Possibility Lunch: Digital Research Co-op

Monday, October 2, 2017 - 12:00pm

RBH 191/197, 1102 S. McAllister Ave. Tempe, AZ 85281

Nexus and HSCollab invite you to the first of this years' Possibility Lunches on the topic of "Digital Research Co-ops: Making, Thinking, and Doing Together"

ASU Faculty Seed Grant Workshop

Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 12:00pm

SS109

 Are you an ASU faculty member with a humanities research idea? The Seed Grant program is designed to provide support for projects that advance the IHR’s mission of fostering research that addresses or explores significant social challenges in the past, present, and future, employing humanities or transdisciplinary methodologies. Bring your own lunch and learn more about the competitive IHR Seed Grant program, the application process, and budget instructions at our IHR Seed Grant Workshop.

"Making Money: Communities, Capital, and Creativity" Fellows Symposium

Friday, April 28, 2017 - 8:30am

SS109

In the culminating event of the year, the IHR Fellows will come together at the spring symposium, “Making Money: Communities, Capital, and Creativity,” in order to address the relationship between money and the humanities. The symposium will feature a keynote lecture from Dr. Emily Gilbert, the Fellows’ presentations of their own work, and a roundtable discussing new directions for humanist research on money.

Money Matters: War, Terrorism, and Accountability, Keynote Lecture

Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 4:00pm

Social Sciences Atrium

Reception: 4:00pm (Social Sciences Atrium)
Black Joy as a Frame for Digital Practice: a Libidinal Economic Approach to Black Online Culture

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 3:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Join Andre Brock as he theorizes Black digital practice through the frame of “joy” - or as Lyotard would have it, jouissance. Writing about Black digital practice often revolves around oppression, resistance, labor, or consumption. The blind spot of these approaches is the blackboxing of the desires of technology practice, or technoculture, an American mythology drawing upon beliefs about Whiteness, modernity, and the future.

Lunchtime conversation with Dr. Andre Brock

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 12:00pm

Nexus Lab (COOR 5519)

Dr. Brock is one of the preeminent scholars of Black cyberculture, and his scholarly work intersects critical discourse studies, technology and media studies, and informatics. His current work considers Black communication practices and online media. Brock has recently completed a sabbatical as a visiting researcher with the Social Media Collective at Microsoft Research New England, and is working on a manuscript on Black online technoculture.

Please RSVP as lunch will be provided.

In Dangerous Times: Women's Friendships and International Networks in the Spanish Civil War

Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 1:00pm

CGA Hayden Library

Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 1:00pm to Friday, April 21, 2017 - 4:30pm

Thursday, April 20th, 2017

1:00-2:40 pm, Circulation C6A Hayden Library -- Screening of: Las trece rosas (Dir. Emilio Martínez-Lázaro, 2007)

Connect: The Humanities and Public Life

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 3:00pm

Across the country, faculty and students are collaborating with campus and community partners in publicly engaged arts and scholarship projects. In their projects, “the humanities” expand from a cluster of disciplines into a process and practice. Join Teresa Mangum (University of Iowa) as she discusses the connection between the humanities and public life. 

Reproductive Health AZ

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Erica O’Neil, Postdoctoral Fellow at the Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics
Jane Maienschein, Director of the Center for Biology and Society
Jason Scott Robert, Director of the Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics

Early Modern Plagues: Histories of Resilience

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Plagues and epidemics are not just biomedical crises. They stretch the capacities of human communities and test the resiliency of human systems. Because this is true, the histories of European plagues teach us a great deal about the nature and significance of community and individual health and resilience. Come hear presentations on the history of plagues by Cindy Ermus (University of Lethbridge), Richelle Munkhof (University of Colorado, Boulder), and Jacque Wernimont (ASU), with Monica Green (ASU) as a respondent. Lunch will be provided.

The Royal Scam: Global Repercussions of the Great Potosi Mint Fraud of 1649

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 12:00pm

UCB 266 (West Campus)

This talk examines a massive financial fraud that originated in the remote silver mining town of Potosi, Bolivia. The great mint fraud of 1649, which spanned more than two decades, rocked the financial world of Habsburg Spain and its colonies, Spain's European creditors, and global money markets as distant as Southeast Asia. The discovery and suppression of this criminal enterprise constitute a forgotten chapter in world history.

Screening and Discussion of Food Truck: The Movie

Friday, April 7, 2017 - 6:00pm

The Palm Court, Barrett, the Honors College

Join us for a special screening of Food Truck: The Movie followed by a discussion with director Bryan Sebok. And, of course, enjoy some delicious food from the food trucks!
This event is part of "Talking Food: Food Deserts and Food Trucks," a day-long event during which scholars and students explore questions of food in contemporary American culture and society. 

Urban Food Deserts: Challenges and Solutions

Friday, April 7, 2017 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Food: we all need it, but we don’t all have equal access to it, and we don’t all get it in the same way. Spend a day talking, eating and watching a movie with us, as we explore questions of food in contemporary American culture and society. First off: a panel discussion on food deserts, areas in which healthy foods like fruits and vegetables are scarce due to lack of vendors.  Second: a screening of Brian Sebok’s documentary Food Truck: The Movie, a documentary on the mobile food movement. Added bonus: Food trucks at Barrett!

The Endgame Project: Theater, Life, and Parkinson's Disease - Special Preview

Thursday, April 6, 2017 - 6:00pm

Beus Center for Law and Society, 111 East Taylor Street, Phoenix 85004 – 5th Floor

Dan Moran and John Christopher Jones represent six decades of acting between them. They have appeared on Broadway, Off-Broadway, in regional theater, in films, and on TV. They met in 1995 while sharing a dressing room in the Broadway production of A Month in the Country. Now they share another bond: both have Parkinson's disease. In spite of this, Dan and Chris continue to work as actors. A new documentary film, THE ENDGAME PROJECT, shines a light on their daily battle against this crippling disease while putting up a production of Samuel Beckett's darkly comic play, Endgame. 

2017 IHR Distinguished Lecturer Lauren Berlant

Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 4:30pm

Carson Ballroom

The Institute for Humanities Research is honored to host Lauren Berlant as the 2017 IHR Distinguished Lecturer. On March 23rd, she will give a lecture titled "On Being in Life Without Wanting the World (Living with Ellipsis)." This talk is located in a shattered, yet intelligible zone defined by being in life without wanting the world—a state traversing misery and detachment that, the talk claims, is well-known to historically and structurally subordinated people (people of color, of non-normative sexuality, proletarianized laborers).

2017 IHR Distinguished Lecturer

Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 4:00pm

Carson Ballrom, Memorial Union

The Institute for Humanities Research is honored to announce Lauren Berlant as the 2017 IHR Distinguished Lecturer.
Device Privacy Drop In

Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 11:00am

Nexus Lab (COOR 5519)

Are you asking yourself: How can I use public wifi safely? If I’m worried about being tracked on the internet, how can I protect myself? And how am I supposed to keep track of all those complex passwords, anyway?

Distinguished Lecturer Lauren Berlant Reading Group 3

Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

The IHR is hosting a Berlant reading/discussion group and brownbag in three parts.
The Paradox of Women in Sport Leadership

Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - 4:00pm

West Hall 135 (ASU Tempe)

A puzzling paradox exists when it comes to women occupying sport leadership positions. Two generations removed from Title IX, female sports participation is at an all-time high, yet the number of women sport leaders is near an all-time low. At the college level alone, female coaches are in the minority, representing just 43% of all head coaching positions in women’s sports nationwide.

Humanities at Work Brown bag: Germans on the Kenyan Coast

Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Diani, a coastal town on the Indian Ocean, is significantly defined by a large European presence that has spurred economic development and is also supported by close relationships between Kenyans and European immigrants and tourists.

Distinguished Lecturer Lauren Berlant Reading Group 2

Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

The IHR is hosting a Berlant reading/discussion group and brownbag in three parts.
The Great American Graphic Novel

Thursday, February 16, 2017 - 1:00pm

Payne Hall

A behind-the-scenes look at the current comics renaissance with Mark Siegel

Mark Siegel is an award-winning illustrator and author of several children’s picture books and graphic novels, including the New York Times bestseller Sailor Twain, or The Mermaid in the Hudson. Mark is the founder and editorial director of First Second Books, an imprint of Macmillan Publishers that creates graphic novels for every age category, in a wide range of themes and styles, with talent from all over the world.

Reimagining Citizenship: Beyond the Right to Rights

Thursday, February 16, 2017 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Charles Lee, Associate Professor, Justice and Social Inquiry, School of Social Transformation
John Carlson, Associate Professor, Religious Studies; Associate Director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict at Arizona State University
Heather Curry, Assistant Professor of Communication, College of Integrative Sciences and Arts

Seed Grant Application Workshop

Wednesday, February 15, 2017 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Do you have a compelling transdisciplinary research idea? Are you or one of your colleagues doing research in the humanities that is transdisciplinary, collaborative, and issue-focused?

Bring your own lunch and learn more about the competitive IHR Seed Grant program, the application process, and budget instructions at our IHR Seed Grant Workshop.

The Encrypted Information Security: Rethinking Social Theory in an Age of Cryptology

Friday, February 10, 2017 - 12:00pm

Nexus Lab (COOR 5519)

Come to the IHR Nexus Lab for a hosted lunch with Quinn DuPont and Bradley Fidler. Quinn DuPont (University of Toronto) uses the approaches and methodologies of critical code studies, software studies, digital humanities, and new media studies studies to examine cryptography and code at the intersections of technoculture, new media, philosophy, history, and politics. Bradley Fidler (UCLA) is currently researching the social and institutional practices of US DoD-funded work in networked computing, as well as the socioeconomic and historical basis of network infrastructure and protocols.

Art and Money Exhibition Opening

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 - 6:00pm

Harry Wood Gallery

This year's IHR Art Exhibit will address the theme of "Art and Money." Works will illuminate the theme through critical explorations of the contemporary art market, capitalism, the housing crisis, and the 1%. What role does money have in the political process, social status, and urbanization of society? What is the relationship between contemporary art and commercial art? What gives art financial value? How has the economy manipulated art production? How has money shaped cultural, political, ethical, religious, or aesthetic understandings of the art world?

IHR and OKED Research Academy present "Behind the Scenes: Insider Tips on NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes"

Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

In this Institute for Humanities Research workshop, OKED will facilitate a panel discussion with scholars who have hosted and participated in Summer Seminars and Institutes funding programs from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Distinguished Lecturer Lauren Berlant Reading Group 1

Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

The IHR is hosting a Berlant reading group in three parts.
IHR Fellows Application Workshop "Health"

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Learn more about the competitive IHR Fellows program, the application process, and budget instructions

Reproductive Health Arizona: Panel and Social Hour

Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 5:00pm

Beus Center for Law and Society, 111 East Taylor Street, Phoenix 85004 – 5th Floor

5:00pm: Networking, Art Showcase, and Performances 6:30pm: Panel Discussion

RHAZ is a research project that addresses the cultural health of the state, particularly within the context of reproductive health. The project features three key elements; an interactive map, articles, and oral histories that highlight Arizona specific reproductive health topics as well as the public event described below.

Faculty Seminar Series Brown Bag: The ASU Archives of Student Activism

Tuesday, November 15, 2016 - 12:00pm

Luhrs Reading Room, Hayden Library

Shirley Rose, Professor, Department of English Rob Spindler, University Archivist, ASU Libraries Glenn Newman, Graduate Student, Department of English Jessica Boykin, Graduate Student, Department of English

WHA Keynote: "Managing Information, Visualizing Loss in New Naturalist Media"

Thursday, November 3, 2016 - 5:00pm

Social Sciences 109

November 3rd  Reception: 5:00pm | Social Sciences Atrium Keynote: 5:40pm | Social Sciences 109

The 2016 Western Humanities Alliance conference "Convergences among Digital and Environmental Humanities" will kick off with a keynote address by Heather Houser, Associate Professor of English, University of Texas, Austin.

2016 WHA Conference: Convergences Among Digital and Enviornmental Humanities

Thursday, November 3, 2016 - 4:00pm

Graduate Hotel, Tempe AZ

On November 3-4, the IHR will have the privilege of hosting the 2016 Western Humanities Alliance Conference, "Convergences among Digital and Environmental Humanities." Throughout the day, panelists and participants will explore the potential of environmental and digital humanities collaborations that could re-imagine how we analyze food, water, energy, and information as they intersect with long-term planetary well-being. The group will discuss both data and interpretation as tools for bringing about sustainable approaches and outcomes.

Tyranny of the Weak: How North Korea Shakes the World

Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 4:00pm

COOR 4403

The collapse of the North Korean regime has been predicted many times over the past quarter-century. But in 2016 North Korea not only continues to exist, it has recently defied UN sanctions and global condemnation by conducting nuclear and long-range missle tests. What explains North Korea's survival into the twenty-first century and its ability to defy international norms, despite the country's isolation and economic weakness? Charles K.

2016 IHR/CLAS Humanities Authors Reception

Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 4:30pm

Hayden Library Reception Space (1st Floor)

Please join us for the annual Humanities Faculty Authors Reception, hosted by the Institute for Humanities Research and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This event recognizes and celebrates humanities faculty authors from Arizona State University and the substantial body of humanistic research reflected in their publications. 

Buddhist Practices of Self: Spiritual Exercises

Wednesday, September 28, 2016 - 4:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Hosted by the Center for Asian Research with the IHR, renowned scholar Professor Steven Collins (Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation; Distinguished Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies, ASU; Chester D. Tripp Professor in the Humanities, The University of Chicago) will present "Buddhist Practices of Self: Spiritual Exercises" as part of for a four-part lecture series "Civilization History: From Acculturation to Regimes of Truth."

Faculty Seminar Series Brown Bag: Poetry of Citizenship

Wednesday, September 28, 2016 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences Bldg 109

Bring a lunch and join Sally Ball, Associate Professor of English, poet, and associate director of Four Way Books, as she enlightens us on poetry and its potential impact on politics and citizenship.

Director Candidate Talk: Laura Mandell

Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 3:30pm

West Hall 135

Join the us as we meet Laura Mandell, a candidate for the open directoral position at the IHR. She is currently the Director of the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture at Texas A & M University.

The meeting will be an open forum. The candidate will provide a 10-minute vision statement, followed by a 45-minute Q&A session.

Buddhist Practices of Self: Historical and Philosophical Contexts

Wednesday, September 21, 2016 - 4:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Hosted by the Center for Asian Research with the IHR, renowned scholar Professor Steven Collins (Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation; Distinguished Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies, ASU; Chester D. Tripp Professor in the Humanities, The University of Chicago) will present "Buddhist Practices of Self: Historical and Philosophical Contexts" as part of for a four-part lecture series "Civilization History: From Acculturation to Regimes of Truth."

Fall 2016 Seed Grant Information Workshop

Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Do you have a compelling transdisciplinary research idea? Are you or one of your colleagues doing research in the humanities that is collaborative and issue-focused? Bring your own lunch and learn more about the competitive IHR Seed Grant program, the application process, and budget instructions at our IHR Seed Grant Workshop.

Research Networking Reception

Thursday, September 8, 2016 - 4:30pm

Social Sciences 109

Do you want to find someone with similar research interests? Come ready to mix and match at the 2016 Research Networking Reception, hosted by the Institute for Humanities Research. This informal event offers a fun opportunity to network with colleagues from across the university, discover common areas of interest, and share your research projects. (Are you already a well-connected senior faculty member?

New Faculty Orientation

Thursday, September 8, 2016 - 3:30pm

Social Sciences 111

New humanities and arts faculty are invited to join us the hour before the Networking Reception for an exclusive orientation.

The Sociology of Wisdom: Superrerogation in Morality and Society

Wednesday, September 7, 2016 - 4:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Hosted by the Center for Asian Research with the IHR, renowned scholar Professor Steven Collins (Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation; Distinguished Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies, ASU; Chester D. Tripp Professor in the Humanities, The University of Chicago) will present "The Sociology of Wisdom: Supererogation in Morality and Society" as part of for a four-part lecture series "Civilization History: From Acculturation to Regimes of Truth."

Civilization History: From Acculturation to Regimes of Truth

Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 4:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Hosted by the Center for Asian Research with the IHR, renowned scholar Professor Steven Collins (Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation; Distinguished Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies, ASU; Chester D. Tripp Professor in the Humanities, The University of Chicago) will present "Civilizational Dynamics and Practices of Self" as part of for a four-part lecture series "Civilization History: From Acculturation to Regimes of Truth." 

"Thank You" Celebration for Sally Kitch

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 - 4:30pm

University Club Bistro

After almost a decade as the Director of the IHR, Sally Kitch is stepping down from that position so she can contribute to ASU in new ways as a University Professor. Come join IHR staff, supporters, and faculty as we share our favorite memories, thank her for her incredible tenure, and look forward to her exciting achievements to come!

 

From Mindfulness to Resilience: Two Contexts

Wednesday, April 27, 2016 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Mark Lussier, Chair & Professor, Department of English Alison C. Essary, Director of Student Affairs, College of Health Solutions, Clinical Associate Professor, School for the Science of Health Care Delivery

All the Days of Their Lives: The Lifecycle of a Family Business

Monday, April 25, 2016 - 11:30am

Coor Hall 4401

Tracing the Morice family bakery in Aberdeen, Scotland over the course of the 18th century, Professor Deborah Simonton examines the intersection of family and business life, private and public.  The Morice family allows us to see how commercial activities were intertwined with the political, religious and social cultures of the town.  In these activities and commercial spaces, gender was not neutral; it was a fundamental aspect of how families managed business and life.

Fellows Symposium: Making Monsters

Friday, April 22, 2016 - 9:00am

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In coordination with the multi-year celebration of the bicentennial of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, the IHR Fellows program for the 2015-16 academic year investigated what the eruption or suppression of the monstrous shows us about ourselves and our possibilities as humans, and what the warnings, disruptions, and abjections of the monstrous show us about our restless cultural imaginary. They now invite you to their symposium, "Making Monsters," where the Fellows will present their research and new insights gained through their participation in this program.

Scary Monsters: The Hopeful Undecidability of David Bowie (1947-2016)

Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 4:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

As the keynote lecture for the 2016 IHR Fellows Program Symposium “Making Monsters,” Alex Sharpe (Professor of Law, Keele University, UK) will consider David Bowie as an exemplar of the monster. Bowie, counter-cultural icon and sublime anti-hero, will provide a contemporary vehicle for thinking through some key categorical distinctions which the monster brings to crisis. Sharpe’s talk will journey through the territory of sex, gender, and sexuality, human/animal hybridity, and the relationship between the human and divine – or, at least, the sacred and profane.

IHR 2016 Distinguished Lecturer: Zadie Smith

Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 7:00pm

Tempe Center for the Arts

The IHR is proud to announce that it is partnering with the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing to host award winning author Zadie Smith as the 2016 IHR Distinguished Lecturer/Piper Center Distinguished Visiting Writer. Smith, a tenured professor of creative writing at New York University, has been recognized for her vibrant insights into contemporary multicultural life from the start. She received numerous awards for her first novel, White Teeth (2000) including the Commonwealth Writers Prize, the Whitbread First Novel Award, and the Guardian’s First Book Award.

Distinguished Lecturer, Zadie Smith, Reading Group 3

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 - 12:00pm

Tempe Center for the Arts

In keeping with its tradition of bringing some of the brightest and most innovative humanists to speak at ASU, the IHR is proud to announce that it is partnering with the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing to host award winning author Zadie Smith as the 2016 IHR Distinguished Lecturer/Piper Center Distinguished Visiting Writer. Smith, a tenured professor of creative writing at New York University, has been recognized for her vibrant insights into contemporary multicultural life from the start.

Humanities at Work Brown Bag: Creative Push

Monday, April 4, 2016 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Creative Push is an oral history and multimedia art project about birth. Professor Forrest Solis, founder and principle investigator, will be joined by Ashley Czajkowski, audio technician and story editor, and Rosalind Shipley, podcast creator, to discuss the important and transformative role storytelling plays in helping women make sense and find meaning in their birth experience. Attendees will hear powerful audio stories, see one of a kind works of art, and learn about how Creative Push helps to build community and foster connectivity among women.

Nobody Said it was Easy-- Practicing Multicultural Digital Humanities

Friday, April 1, 2016 - 10:00am

Language and Literature Building 68

Lead Facilitator:
Lucia Binotti, Professor, Spanish, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Other Faciliators:
Michael Simeone, Director, IHR Nexus Lab
Andrew Ross, Head, SILC Learning Support Services
Dan Gilfillan, Associate Professor, German Studies, SILC

Professor Binotti will be leading a workshop for humanities faculty, graduate students, and academic professionals who are interested in developing digital humanities projects as part of their research portfolios.

From Reading to Making: Building as a New Hermeneutics for the Humanities

Thursday, March 31, 2016 - 3:30pm

Hayden Library Upper Concourse, Room C-6

Lucia Binotti, Professor of Spanish, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

NEH Application- Writing Workshop

Wednesday, March 30, 2016 - 8:30am

Ventana Ballroom A, Memorial Union, ASU (MU 241A)

Come join ASU's Institute for Humanities Research as it hosts an NEH Application-Writing Workshop, facilitated by Claudia Kinkela, a Senior Program Officer in the National Endowment for the Humanities' Division of Research Programs. We invite any interested faculty and research administrators to join the IHR and Dr. Kinkela for tips and strategies for writing competitive proposals, an overview of NEH funding opportunities, a mock review panel, and 20 minute one-on-one meetings on March 30. The limited number meetings on March 30 and 31 have been filled.

"Remembering Injustice and Atrocity: Whose Responsibility?"

Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 12:15pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Margaret Walker, Donald J. Schuenke Chair in Philosophy at Marquette University

The Meanings of Celebration and Commemoration Brownbag - "Remembering WWII: Victims and Survivors"

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 - 10:00am

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Daniel Gilfillan, Associate Professor of German Studies and Information Literacy, School of International Letters and Cultures
Martin Matuštík, President of the ASU-West senate; Lincoln Professor of Ethics & Religion; Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies; Affiliate Professor of Jewish Studies

Medical Humanities Reading Series: On "Being Mortal" by Atul Gawande

Tuesday, March 22, 2016 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

This event is the first session in the Medical Humanities Reading Series and will be based on the non-fiction book Being Mortal by Atul Gawande. The subject of this work, especially the second half which will be the focus of this session, is incredibly relevant to the state of the American health system today.

Distinguished Lecturer, Zadie Smith, Reading Group 2

Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In preparation for the Institute for Humanities Research's 2016 Distinguished Lecturer, Zadie Smith, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in three parts. The reading groups will read and discuss selected pieces from Smith's body of work and are free and open to the public.

Led by Melissa Free, Assistant Professor, Department of English

This meeting's readings:

Climate Justice in an Age of Ecological Insecurity

Wednesday, March 2, 2016 - 3:30pm

West Hall 135

Julie Sze, University of California Davis

American Studies and Environmental Justice in a Moment of Danger

Wednesday, March 2, 2016 - 10:00am

West Hall 135

Julie Sze, Professor and Director of American Studies, UC Davis

Join the IHR's American Studies Research Cluster for a provocative discussion about American Studies, Environmental Studies, and interdisciplinarity with Julie Sze. Dr. Sze is a leading scholar in American Studies and Environmental STudies whose work draws upon cultural studies, community development, geography, and women's studies. 

The Meanings of Celebration and Commemoration Brownbag - "Celebrations, Inclusions, and Resistances"

Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 11:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Maria Cruz-Torres, Southwest Borderlands Scholar, Associate Professor, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Marlon Bailey, Associate Professor, School of Social Transformation

Ernesto Pujol Presents Making Conscious Culture

Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 7:00pm

Grant Street Studios (6-5 E Grant St., Phoenix, AZ 85004)

The artist discusses his performative walking as a public art practice that seeks to generate conscious culture, in terms of greater individual and collective consciousness of the complex webbing of life, of our Oneness. Pujol will show a selection of images from past durational performance group projects in cities such as Chicago, Honolulu, and Salt Lake.

"Journey of the Universe" - Film Discussion with Mary Evelyn Tucker

Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

We have discovered what no previous generation knew – the ways in which galaxies and stars, planets and living organisms emerged within the vast drama of the universe. What role do humans play in this 14-billion-year process? How do we connect with the intricate web of life? Weaving modern science with enduring wisdom from the world’s cultures, Journey of the Universe explores cosmic and Earth evolution as a profound process of creativity, connection, and interdependence, and offers an opportunity to respond to ecological and social challenges of our times.

"The Motherhood Archives" Irene Lusztig Film Screening

Friday, February 5, 2016 - 4:00pm

ASU Critique Room, 605 E Grant St. Phoenix, AZ 85004

 THE MOTHERHOOD ARCHIVES is a meditation on the maternal body as a site of institutional control, ideological surveillance, medical knowledge, and nationalist state intervention.

"Creative Push" Group Exhibition

Thursday, February 4, 2016 - 12:00pm

ASU Step Gallery, 605 E Grant St. Phoenix, AZ 85004

Dance Performance by Angeline Young: Feb. 5, 2016, 7 p.m.
Creative Push is a multimedia art and oral history project about birth.
For more information visit: http://creativepush.org

The Meanings of Celebration and Commemoration Brownbag-- "Memorializing Greatness"

Wednesday, February 3, 2016 - 11:30am

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

“Meaning of Mahatma Gandhi Representations in the National Branding of India”

Deepak Chhabra, Associate Professor, School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University; Senior Sustainability Scientist: Global Institute of Sustainability, Arizona State University

"Money" IHR Fellows Program Information and Workshop

Tuesday, February 2, 2016 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Does your research concern topics relating to money?

Bring your own lunch and learn more about the competitive IHR Fellows program, the application process, and budget instructions at our IHR Fellows Program Workshop on February 2nd, 2016 at 12:00pm-1:15pm in SS 109.

IHR Art Exhibition "Monstalgia" Opening Reception

Friday, January 29, 2016 - 4:00pm

Harry Wood Gallery (Art Building, ASU Tempe Campus)

In conjunction with the IHR 2015 - 2016 Fellows theme, "Monsters and Monstrosity," as well as in preparation for the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Monstalgia explores incarnations of monsters, robots, aliens, and other fantastical creatures in contemporary art through the lenses of both nostalgia - a longing for a home that no longer exists - and solstalgia - a longing for life before environmental change and all its ramifications.

Seed Grant Information Workshop 2016

Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 11:30am

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Do you have a compelling transdisciplinary research idea? Are you or one of your colleagues doing research in the humanities that is transdisciplinary, collaborative, and issue-focused?

Bring your own lunch and learn more about the competitive IHR Seed Grant program, the application process, and budget instructions at our IHR Seed Grant Workshop.

Nexus Lab Workshop: Decision Design and Visual Analytics for Sustainability Applications

Friday, January 22, 2016 - 1:00pm

5519 Lattie F Coor Hall

This workshop will take place every Friday at the same time and location for the Spring of 2016. 

The Nexus Lab for Digital Humanities and Transdisciplinary Informatics will offer a workshop in Decision Design and Visual Analytics for Sustainability Applications during the Spring Semester of 2016. The workshop aims to connect problem solving for sustainability solutions with training in network modeling, data visualization, and communication of results from mixed methods analysis and decision making.

Judith Rodenbeck Presents Bipedal Modernity

Thursday, January 21, 2016 - 5:30pm

ASU Art Museum

Judith Rodenbeck is an art historian and cultural critic specializing in intermedia of the 1950s and 1960s. Her talk examines moments in visual production from the 19th to the 21st centuries and how we understand embodiment. It begins with the invention of cinema and walks on the moon. The former allowed for a biomechanical description of the act of walking, undertaken in the Paris studios of Etienne-Jules Marey, while the latter was the partial subject of Pierre Huyghe’s Ann Lee project, one of the most haunting examples of late 20th century art.

Desert Cities Symposium

Friday, November 20, 2015 - 11:15am

Graduate Hotel

Keynote by Emily Talen - "Walkable Diversity in Future Desert Cities"
November 19th, 2015 | 5:00pm - reception | 5:30pm - lecture | Social Sciences 109

Symposium: November 20th, 2015 | 8:30 - 5:30 pm | Graduate Hotel

Walkable Diversity in Future Desert Cities

Thursday, November 19, 2015 - 5:00pm

Social Sciences 109

Reception: 5:00pm, SS 109
Lecture: 5:30pm, SS 109

Urban planners are now focused on increasing the nation’s supply of pedestrian-based, socially diverse human settlements. This “walkable diversity” encapsulates the merger between social justice and environmental sustainability. Emily Talen's keynote lecture will review the state of the pursuit of walkable diversity, including research debates, implementation hurdles, and entrenched conflicts over strategies and priorities. Respondent Sally Kitch will address "The Dangers of Utopianism."

The Art and Science of Resilience- ASU Tempe

Tuesday, November 17, 2015 - 5:00pm

Video Conference to ASU Tempe, SS109

Panel held at Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Ashton B. Taylor Auditorium
Other Video Conference Locations: ASU Downtown Campus, Health South Room 442
5:00pm | Reception
5:30pm | Panel

The IHR and the Center for Humanities in Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Arizona invite you to join us for the next event in our ongoing collaboration, the Imagining Health Project. This year, we have chosen to facilitate programs clustered around the theme of resilience - a concept that has helped build new questions about health for individuals, communities, and the physical environments we share.

Replicas and Replication Brown Bag Lecture Series

Thursday, November 5, 2015 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In the nineteenth century, there was an explosion of an enormous range and vitality of replication, reproduction, and imitation. The century was called the “culture of replication” (Miles Orvell, The Real Thing: Imitation and Authenticity in American Culture, 1989, 39) and was inspired by the industrial Revolution, growing developments in mass media and the spread of education and literacy to the mass public.

Cosmopolitanism and Historic Homelands

Friday, October 30, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Laurie Manchester, Associate Professor of History, Arizona State University
Brian Horowitz, Professor of Russian and Jewish Studies, Tulane University

Cognitive Aesthetics: Beauty, the Brain, and Virginia Woolf

Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 11:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

 In this talk, drawn from his book, Beauty and Sublimity: A Cognitive Aesthetics of Literature and the Arts (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in 2016), Hogan outlines an account of aesthetic response that synthesizes the insights of cognitive neuroscience with those implicit in Virginia Woolf’s novel, Mrs. Dalloway. Hogan begins by briefly outlining an explanation of beauty based on human information processing (specifically, pattern isolation and prototype approximation). He goes on to consider complications.

Replicas and Replication Brown Bag Lecture Series

Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In the nineteenth century, there was an explosion of an enormous range and vitality of replication, reproduction, and imitation. The century was called the “culture of replication” (Miles Orvell, The Real Thing: Imitation and Authenticity in American Culture, 1989, 39) and was inspired by the industrial Revolution, growing developments in mass media and the spread of education and literacy to the mass public.

Women’s Empowerment?: Building Tools to Listen to Refugee Women Resettling in Phoenix

Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Elenore Long, Associate Professor, Department of English

The “refugee crisis” is a prominent news item that will remain long after our attention has moved to other headlines. This brownbag focuses on a growing, intercultural cluster of people who have been involved for over a decade with South Sudanese resettlement in Phoenix. Their work takes up competing arguments for women’s empowerment; together they have built tools to help various stakeholders listen to and support women’s purposes for their own lives.

Transforming Contagion

Friday, October 23, 2015 - 4:00pm

ASU West Campus| University Center Building (UCB), La Sala Room ABC

At this event, Keynote Speakers, Priscilla Wald, English and Women's Studies, Duke University, Alice Echols, English, Gender Studies, History, USC, and G. Elmer Griffin, Critical Theory and Social Justice, Occidental College, will present on the topic of Transforming Contagion.

Replicas and Replication Brown Bag Lecture Series

Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In the nineteenth century, there was an explosion of an enormous range and vitality of replication, reproduction, and imitation. The century was called the “culture of replication” (Miles Orvell, The Real Thing: Imitation and Authenticity in American Culture, 1989, 39) and was inspired by the industrial Revolution, growing developments in mass media and the spread of education and literacy to the mass public.

Hum/antics: Celebrating Humanities Fun at ASU

Friday, October 16, 2015 - 11:00pm

ASU Art Museum

As part of a month-long commemoration of its 10th Anniversary, the IHR will be hosting a party to celebrate the diversity of humanities research at ASU. Come broaden your horizons through virtual reality, or awash yourself in multisensory performances; learn origami and create memories in the humanities photobooth; express your poetic side at the open mic, or share your passion through the Humanities Manifesto board; above all: eat, drink, and be merry with other lovers of the humanities!

IHR 10th Anniversary Series: The Legacy of the Digital Humanities: Scholarship, Resources, Innovation

Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 11:00pm

4:00 pm Reception: Social Sciences Atrium
4:30pm Lecture: Social Sciences 109

As disruptors of conventional arrangements of privatization and intellectual property, the digital humanities offer exciting new possibilities for innovation in the liberal arts. How can the digital humanities transform our ideas about academic production, theory, research methods, and overarching humanities research questions in the contemporary university? Join Jennifer Guiliano as she explores the ways that the digital humanities can innovate the technical and social architectures of the academy.

Replicas and Replication Brown Bag Lecture Series

Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In the nineteenth century, there was an explosion of an enormous range and vitality of replication, reproduction, and imitation. The century was called the “culture of replication” (Miles Orvell, The Real Thing: Imitation and Authenticity in American Culture, 1989, 39) and was inspired by the industrial Revolution, growing developments in mass media and the spread of education and literacy to the mass public.

IHR 10th Anniversary Series: Urbanism and the Humanities: The Contribution of the Humanities to the Megacities of the Future

Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 11:00pm

Reception: 4:00pm, Secret Garden, West Hall
Lecture: 4:30pm, West Hall, Room 135
RSVP

Replicas and Replication Brown Bag Lecture Series

Thursday, October 8, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In the nineteenth century, there was an explosion of an enormous range and vitality of replication, reproduction, and imitation. The century was called the “culture of replication” (Miles Orvell, The Real Thing: Imitation and Authenticity in American Culture, 1989, 39) and was inspired by the industrial Revolution, growing developments in mass media and the spread of education and literacy to the mass public.

IHR 10th Anniversary Series: Humanities, Biotechnology and the Politics of Health

Tuesday, October 6, 2015 - 4:00pm

As part of the commemoration of its 10th Anniversary this year, the IHR will be hosting Priscilla Wald, Professor of English and Women's Studies, Duke University. Wald will present a Medical Humanities lecture titled "Humanities, Biotechnology and the Politics of Health."

Replicas and Replication Brown Bag Lecture Series

Thursday, October 1, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In the nineteenth century, there was an explosion of an enormous range and vitality of replication, reproduction, and imitation. The century was called the “culture of replication” (Miles Orvell, The Real Thing: Imitation and Authenticity in American Culture, 1989, 39) and was inspired by the industrial Revolution, growing developments in mass media and the spread of education and literacy to the mass public.

IHR 10th Anniversary Series: The Future and Value of Humanities Research

Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 11:00pm

Memorial Union, Room 220

Reception: 4:00pm
Lecture: 4:30pm

As part of the commemoration of the IHR's 10th Anniversary this year, NEH Chairman Adams will present a lecture titled "The Future and Value of Humanities Research."

2015 IHR/CLAS Humanities Authors' Reception

Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 7:00pm

University Club

Please join us for the annual Humanities Faculty Authors’ Reception, hosted by the Institute for Humanities Research and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This event recognizes and celebrates humanities faculty authors from Arizona State University and the substantial body of humanistic research reflected in their publications. Over 70 titles published from the last year by ASU humanities faculty will be displayed and celebrated.

Seed Grant Workshop

Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Do you have a compelling transdisciplinary research idea? Are you or one of your colleagues doing research in the humanities that is transdisciplinary, collaborative, and issue-focused?

Bring your own lunch and learn more about the competitive IHR Seed Grant program, the application process, and budget instructions at our brown bag IHR Seed Grant Workshop.

The Meanings of Celebration and Commemoration Faculty Seminar Series -- The "Fifteen Years After 9/11" Project

Friday, September 11, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

To kick off the 2015-16 IHR Faculty Seminar series "The Meanings of Celebration and Commemoration," this panel will explore the social and cultural impact of the post-9/11 wars and the implications of national and international security concerns on civic life. The panelists aim to demonstrate the vital role of the humanities for helping society to understand how nearly a decade and a half of war has affected core ideas, practices, and representations of citizenship, democracy, identity, patriotism, and social responsibility.

Research Networking Reception

Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 11:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Want to find someone with similar research interests? Come ready to mix and match at our annual Research Networking Reception, hosted by the Institute for Humanities Research. This event offers an opportunity to learn about the 2015-16 IHR programs and meet various IHR Fellows, Seed Grant investigators and Research Cluster facilitators. This is a chance to network with colleagues from across the university, discover common areas of interest, and share your research projects. Bring your research partner, your colleague - senior faculty, bring a junior faculty as a "buddy"!

New Humanities Faculty Orientation

Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 10:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 111

The IHR’s annual Research Networking Reception offers a chance to network with colleagues from across the university, discover common areas of interest, and share your research projects.

IHR Fellows Symposium: "The Politics of Emotion"

Friday, May 1, 2015 - 3:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

The 2014-15 IHR Fellows investigated the power of affect across time and space, across fields of knowledge and varieties of personal experience, analyzing how the mobilization of affect shapes cultural, political, religious, scientific or aesthetic understandings and how the invocation of affect interacts with taboos and sanctions, and/or compounds its relations with the world of objectivity and rationality.

Becoming Coalitional: Motion, Emotion, and the Political

Thursday, April 30, 2015 - 11:00pm

LOCATION CHANGE: Social Sciences Building, Room 109

The 2014-15 IHR Fellows Symposium Keynote Lecture

Reception: 4:30pm, atrium of the Social Sciences Building
Lecture: 5:00pm, Social Sciences Building, Room 109

"Carlos Montezuma's Wassaja Newsletter" Panel Discussion

Friday, April 24, 2015 - 5:00am

Labriola National American Indian Data Center, Hayden Library Room 209

The “Carlos Montezuma’s Wassaja Newsletter: Digitization, Access and Context” IHR Seed Grant Project will host a panel discussion with David Martinez (PI, Associate Professor of American Indian Studies, ASU), Peter Iverson (Emeritus Professor of History, ASU), Raphael Bear (former Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation President), Jackie McCalvin (Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation Librarian), and Jacqueline Hettel (Assistant Director, Nexus Lab, ASU).

Conversation: A New Library for the New American University

Thursday, April 23, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Who needs libraries? Who doesn’t need libraries? Join University Librarian Jim O’Donnell as he shares his thoughts on the future of ASU’s libraries and their impact on humanists.

A panel of scholars will respond to his remarks, which will include:

Manfred D. Laubichler, President’s Professor of Theoretical Biology and History of Biology
Hava Tirosh-Samuelson, Director for the Center for Jewish Studies and Professor of History
Jacque Hettel, Assistant Director of the IHR Nexus Lab

Creation Stories in Creation: A Comparative Discussion of Creation Narratives and Human Cultures

Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 7:00pm

“Creation Stories in Creation” will address the cultural and material effects of both Western and Native American creation narratives. Panelists will consider how those stories “travel” from sacred texts, oral traditions, or social assumptions into the lived experience, world views, and creativity of those who adhere to them. After brief presentations, panelists will engage in discussion with audience members around the contribution of creation stories to the meaning of human lives and activities and the structure of human cultures.

Knowing Disease and Accounting for Care

Monday, April 20, 2015 - 6:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109, ASU Tempe Campus

ASU Faculty Presenter: Ben Hurlbut, Assistant Professor, School of Life Sciences, Center for Biology and Society

iMonsoon Public Interactive Experience

Friday, April 17, 2015 - 10:00pm

Matthews Center iStage, 2nd Floor, ASU main (Tempe) campus

We are intimately familiar with the weather and climate of the regions in which we live – the heavy feeling in the air that suggests rain, or the dry electric heat of summer. Yet we also rely on a complex scientific infrastructure to produce weather forecasts and long-range predictions of climate change that are crucial for planning our futures.

Knowing Disease and Accounting for Care

Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 7:00pm

CP18C, Mayo Clinic- Scottsdale

ASU Faculty Presenter: Ben Hurlbut, Assistant Professor, School of Life Sciences, Center for Biology and Society

Contested Terrain: Reflections with Afghan Women Leaders

Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 2:00am

Changing Hands Bookstore, Tempe

Have Americans forgotten about Afghan women? Does the U.S. owe them anything? Contested Terrain, by Dr. Sally Kitch, Regents’ Professor of Women and Gender Studies and Director of the IHR at ASU, discusses contemporary Afghan women’s status and prospects through the incredible stories of two Afghan leaders, Judge Marzia Basel and Ms. Jamila Afghani, and the women’s critical perspectives on international intervention and patriarchal Afghan culture.

Medical Humanities Brunch with Pamela Gilbert

Tuesday, April 14, 2015 - 5:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Come and enjoy the unique opportunity to have close conversation with Pamela Gilbert, the Albert Brick Professor in the English Department at the University of Florida.

Building bridges from humanities to industry: An Investigation of Job Advertisements in Professional Writing Careers

Monday, April 13, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Eva Brumberger, Associate Professor, Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication, School of Letters and Sciences (Co-PI)
Claire Lauer, Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication, School of Letters and Sciences (Co-PI)
Mark Hannah, Assistant Professor, English Department, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, (collaborator)

To Remember, Re-member, and Disremember: Instrumentality of Traditional Chinese Texts

Friday, April 10, 2015 - 3:45pm

Language and Literature Building, Room 14

Scholars from around the world will meet for this two day conference to address questions such as: How does one remember? What does the act of remembering entail? What is the role of writing?

A Lecture by Patricia Leavy: "The Power of Arts-Based Research"

Thursday, April 9, 2015 - 11:00pm

Ventana A, Memorial Union, Tempe Campus

Lecture begins at 4:30pm.

Book Reading, Discussion and Signing: Lee Gutkind & Patricia Leavy

Thursday, April 9, 2015 - 2:00am

Changing Hands Bookstore, Tempe

Come hear Lee Gutkind, author of You Can't Make This Stuff Up, and Patricia Leavy, author of Fiction as Research Practice, read from their creative works, and discuss the ways in which social research can reach the public through both fiction and non-fiction creative writing. Copies of their work will be available for sale and to be signed by the authors.

Why Henry James Now?: A Trandisciplinary Panel

Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 12:00am

Susan Griffin, University of Louisville
Beverly Haviland, Brown University
John Carlos Rowe, University of Southern California
Gregory W. Zacharias, Creighton University

CENAS: How Theatre Can Disrupt Unhealthy Habits

Thursday, March 26, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Tamara Underiner, Associate Dean for Research, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts
Seline Szkupinski-Quiroga, Faculty Research Affiliate, Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center
S Etheridge Woodson, Director, Theatre for Youth MFA and PhD Programs

"Tricksters and Mindful Heretics" Colloquium

Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - 11:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

ASU scholars share their views on creative research, reflecting the theme of disrupting the taken for granted in the inquiry, as "Tricksters and Mindful Heretics."

Participants will include:

CENAS: How Theatre Can Disrupt Unhealthy Habits

Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 7:00pm

CP18C, Mayo Clinic- Scottsdale

Tamara Underiner, Associate Dean for Research, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts
Seline Szkupinski-Quiroga, Faculty Research Affiliate, Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center
S Etheridge Woodson, Director, Theatre for Youth MFA and PhD Programs

"Women, the Environment and Meaningful Change"

Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 11:30pm

Location Change to: Turquoise Ballroom, Memorial Union, ASU Tempe Campus

In the complex world of conservation and poverty alleviation, ambient noises can be deafening.  Listening to the right people, in the right context with a non-biased mindset not only demonstrates respect but saves precious time and resources as you craft solutions to global problems.   Jamie demonstrates – in a lively romp through jungles, villages, oceans and boardrooms – how our environment and its inhabitants present constant clues for solutions if we are present enough to tune-out the ambient noise and tune in to the message: today matters.

Future Tense Workshop - Digital Humanities Version

Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 7:00pm

Nexus Lab | 5519 Lattie F. Coor Hall

Want to share your most exciting ideas with a broad public audience? Join us for a writing workshop with Torie Bosch (link is external), editor of Slate.com’s Future Tense Channel, to explore how writing for venues like Future Tense can help researchers and scholars correct misconceptions, inspire new ways of thinking about divisive issues, and shape the public conversation about big ideas.

Nexus Lab Research Advancement and Innovation Forum | Toward a Digital Henry James

Thursday, February 26, 2015 - 8:00pm

Nexus Lab 5519 Lattie F. Coor

The Nexus Lab is excited to host another Research Advancement and Innovation Forum for the Spring 2015 semester, showcasing the work of two ASU faculty: Shawna Ross (English) and Andrew Pilsch (English).

Seed Grant Information Workshop

Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 6:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Do you have a compelling transdisciplinary research idea? Are you or one of your colleagues doing research in the humanities that is transdisciplinary, collaborative, and issue-focused?

Bring your own lunch and learn more about the competitive IHR Seed Grant program, the application process, and budget instructions at our IHR Seed Grant Workshop.

Nexus Lab: Text-Based Modeling Working Group

Friday, February 20, 2015 - 9:00pm

Nexus Lab, COOR Hall

How do experts in humanities and social science fields make meaningful interventions when working with large collections of documents? How do we move from text data to public, community, or organizational change?

Nexus Lab: Developing Wassaja Team Meeting

Friday, February 20, 2015 - 4:30pm

Nexus Lab, COOR Hall

This group meets to work as a team to develop a web application featuring the Wassaja Newsletter Collection of rare, Yavapai texts written by Carlos Montezuma in the early 20th Century that has been curated in a joint effort by ASU scholars (David Martinez and Jodi Reeves Flores) and the ASU Library (Joyce Martin), and funded by an IHR Seed Grant.

Imagining Disease: Horror and Health in Medicine

Friday, February 20, 2015 - 12:30am

Ashton B Taylor Auditorium, Mayo Clinic - Scottsdale

Dr. Belling will speak on the role of horror, both as an emotional and physical response, and as a cultural or literary genre, in constructing our notions of disease from a historical perspective, examining how it functions from humoral medicine in the Middle Ages through contemporary crises such as the Ebola epidemic. She suggests that horror is an integral aspect of the experience of illness, yet medicine works hard to repress horror in its research and treatment practices and in the education of health care professionals.

Conversations with Alan Lightman

Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 4:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109, ASU Tempe Campus

What do physics and fiction have in common?

At the Crossroads of Science and the Humanities

Tuesday, February 3, 2015 - 11:30pm

Armstrong Hall/Great Hall, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

Does science ever intersect with art, language, and literature? Physicist, novelist, essayist, and author of the bestseller Einstein’s Dreams, Alan Lightman, explored this question and investigated the relationship between the sciences and the humanities in the 2015 IHR Distinguished Lecture in February of 2015.

Faculty Seminar Series: Performing Humanities Research

Friday, January 30, 2015 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

The fourth IHR Faculty Seminar Series Lecture of 2014-15 will feature presentations by Tamara Underiner (Associate Professor, School of Film, Dance and Theatre) and Dan Gilfillan (Associate Professor, School of International Letters and Cultures). More details about the lecture will be forthcoming. 

Daniel Gilfillan, "Sites of Performance: Sound, Ephemerality and the Unhousing of Knowledge"

2015 IHR Art Exhibition Opening and Reception

Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 11:00pm

Harry Wood Gallery, School of Art

The Weight of the World deals first with the false division of reason and affect throughout history and how this dichotomy has traditionally been made tantamount to a male/female, fact/fiction, or STEM/Humanities dichotomy, respectively. A second concentration of this exhibition is the incorporation of sustainability and the necessary employment of both logic and emotion to better determine its prospects. A number of artists featured in this show focus on ideas of inevitable intersection or the visualization of ecological aesthetics.

Distinguished Lecturer, Alan Lightman, Reading Group: Meeting 4

Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 7:00pm

In preparation for the Institute for Humanities Research's 2015 Distinguished Lecturer, Alan Lightman, bestselling author of Einstein's Dreams, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in three parts. The reading groups will read and discuss selected pieces from Lightman's body of work and are free and open to the public. Please RSVP for each meeting you wish to attend as there will be a light lunch provided.

"Monsters and Monstrosity" IHR Fellows Program Information and Workshop

Thursday, January 22, 2015 - 7:00pm

Does your research concern topics such as ‘monsters’ and/or ‘monstrosity’?

Text-Based Modeling Working Group

Friday, January 16, 2015 - 9:00pm

5519 Lattie F. Coor Hall

How do experts in humanities and social science fields make meaningful interventions when working with large collections of documents? How do we move from text data to public, community, or organizational change?

Developing Wassaja Team Meeting

Friday, January 16, 2015 - 4:30pm

Nexus Lab 5519 Lattie F. Coor

Beginning January 2015, the Nexus Lab will launch a new project called Developing Wassaja.

Distinguished Lecturer, Alan Lightman, Reading Group: Meeting 3

Wednesday, December 3, 2014 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In preparation for the Institute for Humanities Research's 2015 Distinguished Lecturer, Alan Lightman, bestselling author of Einstein's Dreams, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in three parts. The reading groups will read and discuss selected pieces from Lightman's body of work and are free and open to the public. Please RSVP for each meeting you wish to attend as there will be a light lunch provided.

Faculty Seminar Series: Laboratory and Studio as Models for Humanities Research

Wednesday, November 19, 2014 - 7:00pm

Generative use cases for reconsidering humanities research methods:

Yerba Mate Tasting and Round Table Discussion

Wednesday, November 19, 2014 - 12:00am

Social Sciences Building, Room 109, ASU Tempe Campus

Panelists from Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, and southern Brazil will discuss the indigenous roots and multiple meanings surrounding yerba maté, a caffeinated South American beverage touted in the United States as a healthy and exotic alternative to black tea and coffee. Free yerba maté samples supplied by Guayakí.

Trans-Indigenous Ecopoetics: Stars, Ocean, and the Multispecies World in Pacific Islanders’ Literature

Monday, November 10, 2014 - 11:00pm

Coor Hall, 4403

In her introduction to Shades of the Planet: American Literature as World Literature, Wai Chee Dimock puts forth that the field of American Studies is "fluid and amorphous, shaped and reshaped by emerging forces, by 'intricate interdependencies' between 'the near and afar, the local and the distant.'" This lecture will examine the fluid, “trans-indigenous” ecopoetics of Pacific Islanders’ literature, drawing on James Clifford's evocation of New Caledonia as connecting place to ocean world, Epeli Hau’ofa’s Pacific-based turn against Asia in "The Ocean in Us," Robert Sullivan's eclectic waka-

A Roundtable with Hsinya Huang, National Sun Yat-sen University

Monday, November 10, 2014 - 5:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Roundtable: Please join Professor Huang for a roundtable focusing on the intersections of American studies, Asia-Pacific American Studies, Indigenous Studies, and the Environmental Humanities.

Workshop: An Introduction to Mapping Humanities Data With Google Tools

Friday, November 7, 2014 - 4:00pm

Nexus Lab, 5519 Lattie F. Coor Hall

An introductory workshop for scholars new to data analysis and visualization.

Distinguished Lecturer, Alan Lightman, Reading Group: Meeting 2

Wednesday, November 5, 2014 - 6:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In preparation for the Institute for Humanities Research's 2015 Distinguished Lecturer, Alan Lightman, bestselling author of Einstein's Dreams, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in three parts. The reading groups will read and discuss selected pieces from Lightman's body of work and are free and open to the public. Please RSVP for each meeting you wish to attend as there will be a light lunch provided.

IHR/Wrigley Lecturer: Dr. Vandana Shiva

Friday, October 31, 2014 - 12:00am

Arizona Ballroom, Memorial Union

By combining sharp intellectual inquiry with courageous grassroots activism, Dr. Vandana Shiva has inspired change and empowered others through her optimism, strength and unwavering determination.

She is a leading proponent of community food security, organic farming, seed saving and women’s involvement in agriculture. She is changing the way the world thinks about food sovereignty and environmental sustainability.

Faculty Seminar Series: Digital Futures for Humanities Research, A Roundtable

Friday, October 17, 2014 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

This Faculty Seminar Roundtable will explore the digital future for humanities research. Kristin Koptiuch, Associate Professor from the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, will present "Hijacking Digital Technologies" where she suggests that humanities scholars must hijack powerful digital technologies, repurposing them by employing the full interpretive strength and creativity of our critical poetic imagination.

Listen(n) Symposium

Thursday, October 16, 2014 - 7:00pm

ASU Art Museum

Keynote: Dr. Sabine Breitsameter, Hessische Film - und Medienakademie

Distinguished Lecturer, Alan Lightman, Reading Group: Meeting 1

Wednesday, October 15, 2014 - 6:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In preparation for the Institute for Humanities Research's 2015 Distinguished Lecturer, Alan Lightman, bestselling author of Einstein's Dreams, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in three parts. The reading groups will read and discuss selected pieces from Lightman's body of work and are free and open to the public. Please RSVP for each meeting you wish to attend as there will be a light lunch provided.

2014 IHR/CLAS Humanities Faculty Authors Reception

Thursday, October 9, 2014 - 11:00pm

Traditions and Thorens Rooms, University Club

Please join us for the annual Humanities Faculty Authors’ Reception, hosted by the Institute for Humanities Research and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This event recognizes and celebrates humanities faculty authors from Arizona State University and the substantial body of humanistic research reflected in their publications. Over 70 titles published from the last year by ASU humanities faculty will be displayed and celebrated.

IHR Nexus Lab: Research Innovation Forum

Friday, September 26, 2014 - 8:00pm

Nexus Lab (Coor Hall 5519)

The very first Research Innovation Forum will be held in the Nexus Lab (Coor Hall 5519) on September 26, 2014, at 1:00pm. For our very first meeting, we have invited Mark Tebeau, Associate Professor of Public History, to share his current research that involves creating a digital archive of oral histories.

For more information on this event see the Nexus Lab website.

Seed Grant Workshop

Thursday, September 25, 2014 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Do you have a compelling transdisciplinary research idea? Are you or one of your colleagues doing research in the humanities that is transdisciplinary, collaborative, and issue-focused?

Bring your own lunch and learn more about the competitive IHR Seed Grant program, the application process, and budget instructions at our IHR Seed Grant Workshop.

Explaining Ebola from a Global Health Perspective: Causation, Crisis, and Coordination

Monday, September 22, 2014 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

The unfolding Ebola epidemic in West Africa is making urgent an understanding of “global health thinking.” Even though still confined to 5 West African countries, the crisis is already global. Not simply because it has drawn in international actors (Doctors Without Borders, WHO, the World Bank, etc.) and not simply because there is the potential of transmission to other countries. Rather, it is “global” because it shows us how global diseases arise: how local circumstances can, through human networks, affect ever larger populations.

Faculty Seminar Series: The Necessity of Collaboration

Friday, September 19, 2014 - 11:30am

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

The 2014-15 IHR Faculty Seminar Series will begin on September 19th with a lecture and discussion led by Andrea Lunsford of Stanford University (emerita) on “The Necessity of Collaboration.” Professor Lunsford will historicize her argument that writing is essentially collaborative, even when the writing seems to be done by a solitary author.

"We Can All Be Writers," A lecture by Elena Poniatowska

Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 7:00pm

Memorial Union 220, Turquoise, ASU Tempe Campus

Elena Poniatowska (born May 19, 1932) is a French-born Mexican journalist and author, specializing in works on social and political issues focused on those considered to be disenfranchised especially women and the poor. In 2013, she won Spain's Premio Cervantes Literature Award, the greatest existing Spanish language literature award for an author's lifetime works, being the 4th woman to receive such recognition.

Research Networking Reception

Sunday, September 14, 2014 - 11:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Want to find someone with similar research interests? Come ready to mix and match at our annual Research Networking Reception, hosted by the Institute for Humanities Research. This event offers an opportunity to learn about the 2014-15 IHR programs and meet various IHR Fellows, Seed Grant investigators and Research Cluster facilitators. This is a chance to network with colleagues from across the university, discover common areas of interest, and share your research projects.

Perils & Perks of Privilege

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 - 1:00am

The Pomegranate Cafe | 4025 E. Chandler Blvd. #28, Phoenix, AZ 85048

The fourth installment out of six unique workshops in which activities and presentations are used to explore the idea of privilege. We'll also consider strategies for combating the multitude of systemic biases that play out in our lives every day. Featuring special guest, Dr. Allison Parker, professor of African American Literature, Rhetoric, and Women & Gender Studies

Facilitated by: Dr. Neal A. Lester, Director of ASU Project Humanities, and Yvette Johnson, community filmmaker & author

'Black Gold' Screening, Coffee and Conversation

Saturday, May 17, 2014 - 8:00pm

W.P. Carey McCord Hall, Room 116

Black Gold follows the efforts of Tadesse Meskela, one man on a mission to save his 74,000 struggling coffee farmers from bankruptcy. As his farmers strive to harvest some of the highest quality coffee beans on the international market, Tadesse travels the world in an attempt to find buyers willing to pay a fair price. Join us for free coffee, the film, and a community conversation with internationals and business students!

Facilitated by: Emeka Ikegwuonu with ASU's Office of Student & Cultural Engagement

Code for PHX Brigade Meetup

Friday, May 16, 2014 - 12:00am

Nexus Lab, Coor Hall, Room 5519

If you’re a techie interested in civic engagement, consider joining the Code for PHX Brigade. An initiative of Code for America, Code for PHX is is working with local volunteers in programming, data mining, design, and civic leadership to create digital tools for our community.

More Information

Final Nexus Lab Working Group

Friday, May 9, 2014 - 8:00pm

Coor Hall, Room 5519

Before the summer begins, the NEXUS lab will hold one final meeting with the working groups. Members of all three groups are invited to attend and if you’re someone who did not participate during the semester, you are still welcome to come and present! We’re asking for volunteers to give a five minute presentation on what they’ve done in the digital humanities this semester and as we shape our agenda for the fall, we’d also like to get feedback about what we’ve done and what you’d like to see more of in the future.

InnovationSpace Show

Thursday, May 8, 2014 - 8:30pm

The Ice House 429 Jackson St., Phoenix, AZ, 85007

InnovationSpace is an entrepreneurial joint venture among the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering and W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. The goal of our transdisciplinary education and research lab is to teach students how to develop products that create market value while serving real societal needs and minimizing impacts on the environment. Put simply, we seek to create products that are progressive, possible and profitable. At the same time, they must have a meaningful impact on the daily lives of ordinary people.

Open Forum on the Future of Humanities

Friday, May 2, 2014 - 11:00pm

Memorial Union, Room 242 (La Paz)

Dr. Leonard Cassuto, Professor of English - Fordham University

What role can English and American Studies play in arguments about the future of the humanities? What insights can American Studies scholars contribute to assessing the value of humanities research and teaching in the university of the 21st century.

This event is open to all students - please RSVP to: grad-rsvp@asu.edu

The Future of Food: Building Sustainable Food Systems in Indigenous Communities

Friday, May 2, 2014 - 1:00am

Heard Museum | Steele Hall | 2301 N. Central Avenue | Phoenix, AZ 85004

This free public event, featuring a lecture by Jim Enote, Director and Curator of the Zuni Museum, a poetry reading by ASU Regents Professor Simon Ortiz, and a music performance by Randy Kemp, seeks to promote food justice in indigenous communities. Jim Enote’s lecture will discuss traditional Zuni farming as cultural practice and will also introduce the concept of “cultural mapping.” Jim Enote’s work in this area draws on art and cultural knowledge of place to demonstrate Indigenous sustainability practices.

Dreaming of Other Planets: Honoring the Life Works of Jose E. Munoz in Queer of Color Critique

Friday, April 18, 2014 - 7:00pm

West Hall, Room 260

Turning to the incredible work of José E. Muñoz, this panel is a tribute to his contributions to Queer theory and Queer of Color experiences. Though his presence on this earth was tragically cut short, José E. Muñoz left a lasting impact. Always looking toward the “potentiality” that queerness provided, Muñoz guided our scholarly thinking to spaces beyond the “here and now” into notions of a “then and there” where dreams awaited and new worlds invented. Panelists will explore Muñoz’ lasting influence and how they apply a Queer of Color Critique to their own research.

Directions in the Medical Humanities - Roundtable

Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 10:30pm

Lunch Seminar: Monday, April 14, 2014 | 12 - 1:30 p.m. | Social Sciences 109 | Watch Video

Roundtable: Tuesday, April 15, 2014 | 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. | Social Sciences 109

Mark Clark of the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch and Kathy Powderly, Director of the John Conley Division of Medical Ethics and Humanities at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center will join us at ASU to share their expertise in medical humanities.

Directions in the Medical Humanities - Luncheon

Monday, April 14, 2014 - 7:00pm

Lunch Seminar: Monday, April 14, 2014 | 12 - 1:30 p.m. | Social Sciences 109 | Watch Video

Roundtable: Tuesday, April 15, 2014 | 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. | Social Sciences 109

Mark Clark of the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch and Kathy Powderly, Director of the John Conley Division of Medical Ethics and Humanities at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center will join us at ASU to share their expertise in medical humanities.

City. Culture. Code.

Saturday, April 12, 2014 - 12:00am

Coor Hall, Room 5519

This event will discuss the Code for America Brigade, a mixture of University researchers, City employees, and local experts in application development aimed at using data, computation, and interdisciplinary research to solve local civic problems in the PHX metro area.

Students, faculty, and staff welcome.

Questions? Contact Michael Simeone (msimeone@asu.edu)

IHR Nexus Lab: Working Groups Meeting

Friday, April 11, 2014 - 7:00pm

Coor Hall, Room 5519

The IHR Nexus Lab is inviting all the members of all three working groups to meet and reflect on the progress and challenges that everyone has experienced with their projects this semester. Please feel free to bring your lunch.

"'A Muhutu in Our Sense is a Poor and Simple Man': The Sociopolitical Dimensions of Ethnic Discourse in Colonial Rwanda"

Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 10:00pm

Coor Hall, 4403

JJ. Carney, Keynote Lecture: 3:00 p.m., Coor Hall, 4403
Roundtable: 3:45 p.m., Coor Hall, 4403

With Professors J.J. Carney, Katherine Osburn (ASU, School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies) and Björn Krondorfer (Director, Martin-Springer Institute at Northern Arizona University

"Traveling to a Place of a Father’s Secret: German Generations Remembering War & the Holocaust”

Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 12:00am

Coor Hall, Room 4403

Björn Krondorfer will speak about German families’ complicated relation to their national past, and will share his personal experiences. A journey to a lesser known labor camp in Poland with his father is the background of his talk - a journey necessitated after Krondorfer learned that a Holocaust survivor he befriended in the United States and his father had been at this site at the same time in 1943-1944.

Designing a New American University: Perspectives and Context on the American Research University

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 11:00pm

William Dabars is Senior Research Fellow for University Design and Director of Special Projects in the Office of the President, Arizona State University. He has co-written a book with ASU President Michael Crow, Designing a New American University (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014). He has served in various research capacities for the University of Southern California, University of California, Santa Barbara, and the Getty Research Institute, one of the operating programs of the J.

IHR Nexus Lab: THATCamp

Friday, April 4, 2014 - 5:00pm

IHR Nexus Lab, Coor Hall, 4th Floor

Michael Simeone, Keynote: Friday, April 4, 2014, 4:30pm Coor 174
Workshops: Saturday, April 5, 2014 8:00am-3:30pm IHR Nexus Lab, Coor Hall, 4th Floor

Ecstatic Corona #5: A new performance by Patricia Clough

Friday, April 4, 2014 - 1:00am

"Ecstatic Corona #5 is one of five pieces that draw on autoethnographic research in Corona, the small town in Queens, New York where I was born and grew up. Each of the pieces is a performance meant to invite the audience into the space of childhood memory, a space of unconscious desire, through a form of writing that mixes autoethnography with the writing of contemporary critical theory and philosophy. The five pieces are meant to demonstrate writing affectively about affect.

Fellows Symposium Keynote Pesentation: Tim Cresswell on "An Outline of a Theory of Place"

Thursday, April 3, 2014 - 11:30pm

Social Sciences 109

Watch the video of the Keynote Lecture

When Dorothy Gale utters the last line of The Wizard of Oz, “There’s no place like home,” there seems little doubt that she speaks out of her joy at being safely ensconced on her family’s farm in America’s Heartland. However, Dorothy’s simple phrase is open to a wide variety of interpretations because of one word—home—that can connote security, belonging, memory, and comfort, or arouse feelings of dread, alienation, and pain.

IHR Fellows Symposium: "There's No Place Like Home..."

Thursday, April 3, 2014 - 11:30pm

Social Sciences 109

Watch the video

When Dorothy Gale utters the last line of The Wizard of Oz, “There’s no place like home,” there seems little doubt that she speaks out of her joy at being safely ensconced on her family’s farm in America’s Heartland. However, Dorothy’s simple phrase is open to a wide variety of interpretations because of one word—home—that can connote security, belonging, memory, and comfort, or arouse feelings of dread, alienation, and pain.

Safety, Soldier, Scapegoat: Pat Tillman and American Civil Religion

Thursday, April 3, 2014 - 10:00pm

West Hall, Room 135

The death of Pat Tillman elicited both heart-felt eulogy and white-hot controversy from a nation divided by war, politics, and religion. In this talk, Jonathan Ebel offers a framework for making sense of the Tillman tragedy and its aftermath, a model that encourages us to see Tillman not as exceptional or unique, but as a twenty-first century embodiment of a figure, the G.I. Messiah, who has loomed large in American perceptions of the soldier since the early twentieth century.

Contesting Visions of Peace: A Colloquium

Thursday, April 3, 2014 - 4:15pm

West Hall, Room 135

How does imagining peace as a utopia shape or impede the movements for peace at the level of states, communities or individuals?

Are there different traditions, and thus practices of peace, across religious, cultural and/or secular communities?

Are there new and emerging contexts that offer a fresh outlook to the study of peace?

For more information on the Conflicting Visions of Peace Colloqium,including schedules, speaker bios and more, click here.

Edgework: Kelly Ritter on "Writing for Scholarly Journals"

Monday, March 31, 2014 - 10:00pm

Social Sciences Bldg, Room 109

With support from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Writing Programs in the Department of English at ASU hosts Kelly Ritter of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in this presentation for English's new Edgework Series.

Ritter offers informal advice and insights on what she’s learned about writing for scholarly journals from her perspective as the editor of a journal devoted to English studies broadly defined.

Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) Regional Workshop

Monday, March 31, 2014 - 5:00pm

Downtown Phoenix Campus

Join us for a free two-day in-person regional XSEDE workshop hosted by Arizona State University. Open to all faculty, researchers, and students in all disciplines including Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS), interested in learning how to incorporate analytics, modeling and simulation, advanced data analysis and visualization, and high performance computing into their teaching and research.

Latin American Research Cluster Series: Mexico de Afuera and its Consuls

Friday, March 28, 2014 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Bldg, Room 109

Lecture by Jaime Aguilera

Managing the Threat of Catastrophes: Can Economic Analysis Inform Policy?

Friday, March 28, 2014 - 4:30pm

Wrigley Hall, Room 481

Professor Robert Pindyck will discuss a framework for evaluating the allocation of efforts to avert different types of catastrophes including: environmental, mega-viruses, nuclear, and terrorism. He considers how these events can have cascading effects, and as a result how we should evaluate the appropriate societal trade-offs, and use them to evaluate policies that avoid these threats.

IHR NEXUS lab Working Group: Text Mining

Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 9:00pm

Coor Hall, Room 4419

This group investigates techniques for data mining text collections as well as work on methods for interpretation of results yielded by automated analysis.

Working groups convene every 2-3 weeks to share progress within the group, search for opportunities to make collaborations among participants, and facilitate presentations by volunteers on specific areas of interest or discovery. While individual learning and development is important, the end goal of the working groups is to produce new configurations of investigators and incubate new projects.

A Public Reading and Book Signing by Manuel Muñoz

Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 8:30pm

Language and Literature Building, Room 002

The Department of English and the Institute for Humanities Research at ASU host award-winning novelist Manuel Muñoz for a reading and signing from his work.

More information about Muñoz is available on his website

For more information
Contact: Lee Bebout
Email: lee.bebout@asu.edu

Heritage vs. Modern Wheat: What are the Differences?

Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 7:00pm

Wrigley Hall, Room 481

Once a highly regarded staple of civilization, wheat is now perceived by many to be a scourge to our health. Wheat is linked to increases in gluten sensitivity, allergies, depression, even obesity. In this talk, Joy Hought will discuss current knowledge about changes in wheat protein and nutrition from ancient to modern times, as well as wheat-breeding techniques.

From Panzas to Prisons: Pedagogy, Social Justice and the Humanities

Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 7:30pm

West Hall, Room 135

Virginia Grise will read from her recent work, focusing on the relationship between cultural workers, social transformation and social movements.

Unruly Bodies: Sex, Race and the State

Friday, March 21, 2014 - 8:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Please join us for presentations by Professor Khiara M. Bridges and Professor Chandan Reddy about how the state defines, regulates, and disciplines unruly bodies—defined by race, gender, sexuality and citizenship. While Professor Bridges focuses on the ways the medical system regulates the bodies of pregnant women of color, Professor Reddy explores how the United States continually legislates freedoms for some bodies while enacting violence upon others.

Ecological Intelligence in the Built Environment

Thursday, March 20, 2014 - 7:00pm

Wrigley Hall, Room 481

Building construction norms and practices have evolved into a set of defaults based on consensus-based industry standards, codes, and regulations. As part of the evolving rules and market forces, ecological intelligence are playing an increasing role in the transparency of building products and systems. Anthony Floyd will discuss these cultural shifts in the industry and the expanding role of regulatory nudges, defaults, disclosure policies, and green-building codes--all aimed at the design and constructing ecologically responsive communities.

IHR NEXUS Lab Working Group: Data Visualization and the Humanities

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 10:00pm

Coor Hall, Room 4419

This group develops visualizations based on digital humanities research, considers the unique needs of humanities for visualization, as well as works with various programs and frameworks for the creation of charts and visuals.

'Tell My Story': The Human Compulsion to Narrate

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 12:30am

Carson Ballroom of Old Main

To watch the video of the 2014 IHR Annual Distinguished Lecturer, Stephen Greenblatt

This video is password protected and limited to the larger ASU community. Please contact the IHR at ihr@asu.edu or 480.965.3000 to obtain the password.

Reception: 4:30pm
Lecture: 5:30pm

Well-being, Public Policy and Complex Urban Systems

Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 7:00pm

Wrigley Hall, Room 481

In this talk, Philip D. Allsopp of Transpolis Global will review well-being metrics and examine the impacts of public policy based on incomplete urban, infrastructure, social and economic models. A case study of Native American housing will be used to highlight the negative impacts of inadequate attention to wellbeing and place-making.

IHR Nexus Lab: Content Management Systems Working Group

Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 7:00pm

Coor Hall, Room 4419

This group experiments with different content management systems that allow for tagging, curation, mapping, and presentation of humanities datasets.

Working groups convene every 2-3 weeks to share progress within the group, search for opportunities to make collaborations among participants, and facilitate presentations by volunteers on specific areas of interest or discovery. While individual learning and development is important, the end goal of the working groups is to produce new configurations of investigators and incubate new projects.

How the Humanities Power Efforts to Live Well (Not Better)

Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 4:45pm

Typically, the story of the American Dream circles around notions of higher standards of living for each succeeding generation. But when we examine the language of the declarations and manifestoes being written around the world by environmental groups and networks, we typically hear calls for a story of another kind, one in which people would seek to live well, not better.

EVENT CANCELED: IHR Research Cluster: Leela Fernandez' "Transnational Feminisim in the United States"

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 - 4:00pm

West Hall, Room 120

During the upcoming academic year, the Local and Global Feminisms research cluster will continue to focus on theories of intersectionality and feminist knowledge within a global and transnational framework as well as those that acknowledge the continuing importance of the nation-state in the construction of identities, desires, and culture. As a part of this ongoing research project, the IHR will be hosting a series of reading groups addressing the above discourses. This reading group will entail a discussion Leela Fernandez' Transnational Feminisim in the United States.

"Multi-media Italian Crime Fiction:" A Lecture by Grazia Verasani

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 - 2:00am

Wrigley Hall, Room 101

Grazia Verasani lives in Bologna, Italy. She is an Italian writer and singer, particularly known for her crime fiction series centered on the investigations of the female P.I. Giorgia Cantini. The first novel of this series has been adapted into a successful movie by the Oscar Academy winner Gabriele Salvatores (“Quo Vadis, Baby?” 2005), and subsequently into a TV series. She has published eight novels, and two plays.

Stephen Greenblatt Reading Group: Public Humanities Revisited

Monday, March 3, 2014 - 6:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

In preparation for the Institute for Humanities Research’s 2014 Distinguished Lecturer, Stephen Greenblatt, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in four-parts that will be led by:

Cora Fox, Associate Professor of English and Associate Director, IHR
Erin McCarthy, Assistant Director, ACMRS
Mike Tueller, Associate Professor of Greek, SILC

Creating a scholarly collection online?

Saturday, March 1, 2014 - 4:00pm

Creating archives for research and presenting research outcomes are some of the biggest reasons scholars in the humanities want to create websites. The IHR Nexus Lab for Digital Humanities and Transdisciplinary Informatics is conducting a day-long workshop on content management systems (CMS) for organizing and presenting content online. This workshop is designed to answer practical questions, share experiences, and expose participants to new resources regarding CMS in the digital humanities.

Joel Zito Araújo: Screening of "Denying Brazil" and Lecture

Friday, February 28, 2014 - 9:00pm

Language and Literature Bldg, Room 60

Joel Zito Araújo is an award winning Afro-Brazilian filmmaker, director, writer, and executive producer of feature films, documentaries, television shows, and educational videos (24 documentaries, 22 shorts and 3 full-length features). His films include: “Raça”; “Denying Brazil”; “Daughters of the Wind”; and “Cinderellas, Wolves, and One Prince Charming." Araújo was born in Nanuque, Minas Gerais in 1954. He holds a Doctorate in Communication Science from the School of Communication and Arts of São Paulo University.

Latin American Research Cluster Series: "Mexican Life and Immigration: A Photographic Study"

Friday, February 28, 2014 - 7:00pm

Hayden Library, Room C6A

This photographic project started over 25 years ago when Emily Matyas went to work for a non-profit, community development program in Sonora, Mexico. Over the years, Matyas kept in contact. As the current immigration debate escalated, she became concerned about its lack of balance and compassion. So, in 2007, Matyas decided to return to Mexico to photograph and interview people whose family members have left for the United States. One thing she discovered is that most Mexicans do not want to leave their homeland and usually do so only out of desperation.

"Between Earth and Sky: Our Intimate Connections to Trees"

Friday, February 21, 2014 - 11:00pm

Coor Hall 170

Click here to watch the recording of this lecture

Coor 170
Lecture: 4:00pm
Book Signing and Refreshments: 5:30pm

Workshop With Peggy Levitt: Bridging Humanities and Social Sciences Research: Locating Funding and Building Successful Collaborations

Friday, February 21, 2014 - 5:00pm

Coor Building, Room 4403

Professor Peggy Levitt is a Professor of Sociology at Wellesley College and a Research Fellow at The Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and The Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations at Harvard University, where she co-directs The Transnational Studies Initiative. She has conducted research on transnational migration and religion across borders.

"Billy and Teddy: Fear, Disinterest and Compassion for Wildlife"

Friday, February 21, 2014 - 12:00am

Marston Exploration Theater, ISTB4 Building

Click here to watch a recording of this lecture

Marston Exploration Theater, ISTB4 Building
Book Signing and Refreshments: 4:00pm
Lecture: 5:00pm

"Who Do You Say I am?: Identity, Migration and Transborder Citizens"

Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 11:30pm

Language and Literature Bldg, Room 165

Diego Fonseca is an Argentine journalist and author. He serves as an editor of the magazine "Etiqueta Negra," and is the author of the anthology "Sam is Not My Uncle: Twenty-four Migrant Chronicles and One American Dream." His other books include "Joseph Stiglitz Stops Time," "The Last Communist of Miami" and "Beaten By Coups: Latin American Growing Pains Since the Era of Dictatorships." In this lecture he will discuss issues of identity, migration and transborder citizenship.

Understanding Social Transformation: Three Perspectives

Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 1:00am

West Hall, Room 135

The School of Social Transformation invites the greater ASU community to a panel discussion held as part of a series of open dialogs in the spring 2014 seminar SST 501: Social Transformation.

The first, held Tuesday, Feb. 18 from 6-7:30 pm in West Hall 135, will feature:

Alex Bontemps
Faculty Head and Associate Professor of African and African American Studies
"The Past: A Historical Approach to Social Transformation"

IHR NEXUS lab Working Group: Data Visualization and the Humanities

Friday, February 14, 2014 - 7:00pm

Coor Hall, Room 4419

This group develops visualizations based on digital humanities research, considers the unique needs of humanities for visualization, as well as works with various programs and frameworks for the creation of charts and visuals.

"Community-Based Participatory Research" with Annabel Taylor

Friday, February 14, 2014 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Bldg, Room 109

Dr. Taylor’s main research interests are Criminal justice social work: women and domestic violence. Dr. Taylor is the PI for two current externally funded research projects. The first involves a collaboration with Christchurch Women’s Refuge, the Family Help Trust and Te Awatea Violence Research Centre to explore the experience of women moving away from violence. The second involves a collaboration with the Canterbury Community Law Centre and concerns the experience of Social Security recipients in New Zealand’s benefit system. Dr.

IHR NEXUS Lab Working Group: Text Mining

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 9:00pm

Coor Hall, Room 4419

This group investigates techniques for data mining text collections as well as work on methods for interpretation of results yielded by automated analysis.

Working groups convene every 2-3 weeks to share progress within the group, search for opportunities to make collaborations among participants, and facilitate presentations by volunteers on specific areas of interest or discovery. While individual learning and development is important, the end goal of the working groups is to produce new configurations of investigators and incubate new projects.

Seed Grant Workshop

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Do you have a compelling transdisciplinary research idea? Are you or one of your colleagues doing research in the humanities that is transdisciplinary, collaborative, and issue-focused?

Bring your own lunch and learn more about the competitive IHR Seed Grant program, the application process, and budget instructions at our IHR Seed Grant Workshop.

IHR Research Cluster: Khiara Bridges' "Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization"

Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 4:00pm

West Hall, Room 120

During the upcoming academic year, the Local and Global Feminisms IHR Research Cluster will continue to focus on theories of intersectionality and feminist knowledge within a global and transnational framework as well as those that acknowledge the continuing importance of the nation-state in the construction of identities, desires, and culture. As a part of this ongoing research project, the IHR will be hosting a series of reading groups addressing the above discourses.

IHR NEXUS Lab Working Group: Content Management Systems

Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 7:00pm

Coor Hall, Room 4419

This group experiments with different content management systems that allow for tagging, curation, mapping, and presentation of humanities datasets.

Working groups convene every 2-3 weeks to share progress within the group, search for opportunities to make collaborations among participants, and facilitate presentations by volunteers on specific areas of interest or discovery. While individual learning and development is important, the end goal of the working groups is to produce new configurations of investigators and incubate new projects.

Greenblatt on Shakespeare: Biographer, Editor, Critic

Monday, February 10, 2014 - 6:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In preparation for the Institute for Humanities Research’s 2014 Distinguished Lecturer, Stephen Greenblatt, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in four-parts that will be led by:

Cora Fox, Associate Professor of English and Associate Director, IHR
Erin McCarthy, Assistant Director, ACMRS
Mike Tueller, Associate Professor of Greek, SILC

No Place Like Home? An Exhibition of the Usual/Familiar

Friday, February 7, 2014 - 9:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

No place like home? An exhibition of the usual/familiar is an exhibition that explores the idea of home on cultural, emotional, intellectual, religious, philosophical, political, and spiritual levels- as a place, a space, a myth, a source of identity, a promised land, a state of being, a war zone, an impossibility, and an inalienable right. This simple word is open to a wide variety of interpretations. Home can suggest security, belonging, memory, and comfort, or arouse feelings of dread, alienation, and pain.

“Affect and Reason” IHR Fellows Program Information and Workshop

Tuesday, February 4, 2014 - 7:00pm

Does your research concern topics such as ‘affect’ and/or ‘reason’?

Bring your own lunch and learn more about the competitive IHR Fellows program, the application process, and budget instructions at our IHR Fellows Program Workshop on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 at 12:00pm-1:30pm in SS 109.

2014 Transdisciplinary Humanities Book Award

Monday, February 3, 2014 - 7:00pm

The Institute for Humanities Research at Arizona State University invites nominations of books written in English and published in 2012 or 2013 which reflect the finest contemporary humanities-based scholarship on any topic.

Nominations should be for books that are:

(a) transdisciplinary in methodology and scope, and
(b) focused on compelling topics of social relevance, past, present, or future.

Latin American Research Cluster Series: "Engaged Anthropology, Testimonies, and Women’s Resistance in Mexico"

Friday, January 31, 2014 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Click here to watch the video

Faculty Seminar Series: "Methods, Practices and the Agency of Things"

Thursday, January 30, 2014 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Join the IHR for its final Faculty Seminar Series of 2013-14 entitled "Methods, Practices and the Agency of Things."

Prasad Boradkar, Associate Professor, Herberger Institute School of Art and Design

"Configuring Things"

Settler Colonialism: A Panel Discussion

Wednesday, January 29, 2014 - 9:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Panelists include:

Kehaulani Vaughn, Ethnic Studies at UC Riverside
David Hinds, African and African American Studies, Arizona State University
Waquin Preston, American Indian Studies, ASU

The Ethnic Studies Working Group (ESWG), an Institute for Humanities Research sponsored research cluster, and the graduate student committee for the ESWG is planning a Spring 2014 panel series surrounding critical topics in the field of Ethnic Studies.

IHR Research Cluster: Chandan Reddy's "Freedom with Violence: Race, Sexuality, and the U.S. State"

Wednesday, January 29, 2014 - 4:00pm

West Hall, Room 120

During the upcoming academic year, the Local and Global Feminisms research cluster will continue to focus on theories of intersectionality and feminist knowledge within a global and transnational framework as well as those that acknowledge the continuing importance of the nation-state in the construction of identities, desires, and culture. As a part of this ongoing research project, the IHR will be hosting a series of reading groups addressing the above discourses. This reading group will entail a discussion Chandan Reddy's Freedom with Violence: Race, Sexuality, and the U.S.

Paper Prototyping Our Radical Bike Futures

Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 7:00pm

Wrigley Hall, Room 481

In this talk and innovative workshop, Lindsay Kinkade will invite participants to quickly prototype the future. Participants will imagine and share what the community might possibly do next to make The Valley of the Sun the most beautiful, fun, user-friendly, walkable, and bikeable region it can be.

Kinkade is an experimental urbanist, strategic futurist, and visual communicator working on the future of cities. In her research, she meets with experts in all fields and rides a bike along light rail and all over downtown Phoenix.

Stephen Greenblatt Reading Group: Public Humanities and Narratives of Cultural Change

Wednesday, December 11, 2013 - 6:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In preparation for the Institute for Humanities Research’s 2014 Distinguished Lecturer, Stephen Greenblatt, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in four-parts that will be led by:

Cora Fox, Associate Professor of English and Associate Director, IHR
Erin McCarthy, Assistant Director, ACMRS
Mike Tueller, Associate Professor of Greek, SILC

"Collective Ethnography and Community Safety in the Carceral State" Lecture with Annie Paradise

Friday, December 6, 2013 - 1:00am

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

This lecture with Annie Paradise, Ph.D candidate of anthropology at California Institute of Integral Studies, is part of the IHR Seed Grant funded Colloquium entitled Humanities Behind the Walls (HBW). HBW is a collaborative reading and research project funded by the IHR that centers learning and ways of knowing grounded in experience and reflection about surviving incarceration and the social conditions of organized premature death.

"Women and Mass Criminalization" Lecture with Tina Reynolds

Thursday, December 5, 2013 - 7:00pm

West Hall, Room 135

This lecture with Tina Reynolds, MSW, from Women on the Rise Telling Her Story (WORTH) is part of the IHR Seed Grant funded Colloquium entitled Humanities Behind the Walls (HBW). HBW is a collaborative reading and research project funded by the IHR that centers learning and ways of knowing grounded in experience and reflection about surviving incarceration and the social conditions of organized premature death.

"Chican@ Epistemology in the Age of Zapatismo"

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 - 7:00pm

West Hall 135

This lecture with Manolo Callahan, Ph.D., is part of the IHR Seed Grant funded Colloquium entitled Humanities Behind the Walls (HBW). HBW is a collaborative reading and research project funded by the IHR that centers learning and ways of knowing grounded in experience and reflection about surviving incarceration and the social conditions of organized premature death.

Other lectures included in this Colloquium:

Thursday, December 5, 12:00p.m., West Hall 135
"Women and Mass Criminalization" Lecture with Tina Reynolds, MSW, Women on the Rise Telling Her Story (WORTH)

Sustainability Themes in Art: Bridging the Field of Art and Environmental Thought from Global Ecological Thinking to Acting as a Spur to Social Activism

Tuesday, November 26, 2013 - 7:00pm

Wrigley Hall, Room 481

In this talk, local artist Joan Baron takes the audience on a visual journey into the richness of her material selections and fabrication processes, as well as the evolution of her artwork, as she seeks to speak about significant issues of our times.

Round Table: "Envisioning Humanities Research through Digital Technologies"

Friday, November 22, 2013 - 4:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Click here to watch the recording of this event

As part of the IHR Nexus Lab kickoff, the IHR is holding the following events
to promote the digital humanities:

"Launch of the IHR Nexus Lab: Digital Humanities and Transdisciplinary Informatics"
Ribbon Cutting, Tour, and Open House

"Digital Humanities, Recursive Communities, and the Future of Scholarly Communication"
A lecture with Matthew Gold, Associate Professor of English and Digital Humanities, CUNY

Keynote Lecture: "Digital Humanities, Recursive Communities, and the Future of Scholarly Communication"

Thursday, November 21, 2013 - 9:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Click here to watch the recording of this event

As part of the IHR Nexus Lab kickoff, the IHR is holding the following events
to promote the digital humanities:

"Launch of the IHR Nexus Lab: Digital Humanities and Transdisciplinary Informatics"
Ribbon Cutting, Tour, and Open House

"Envisioning Humanities Research through Digital Technologies" Round Table
A panel session with Michael Simeone, Adriene Jenik, Matthew Gold, Mark Tebeau, Jaime Casap, and Dan Gilfillan

Launch of the IHR Nexus Lab: Digital Humanities and Transdisciplinary Informatics

Wednesday, November 20, 2013 - 5:30pm

COOR Hall, 4th Floor

As part of the IHR Nexus Lab kickoff, the IHR is holding the following events to promote the digital humanities:

"Digital Humanities, Recursive Communities, and the Future of Scholarly Communication"
A lecture with Matthew Gold, Associate Professor of English and Digital Humanities, CUNY

"Envisioning Humanities Research through Digital Technologies" Round Table
A panel session with Michael Simeone, Adriene Jenik, Matthew Gold, Mark Tebeau, Jaime Casap, and Dan Gilfillan

Histories of Agency: Matter and Being

Monday, November 18, 2013 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Bradley D. Ryner, Assistant Professor, English Department
The Cosmopolitical Economy of The Merchant of Venice

White Coats and Armchairs: Does Science Tell Us About Human Nature

Friday, November 15, 2013 - 8:00pm

Memorial Union, Room 220 (Turquoise Room)

The question of what, if anything, can be said about human nature is evidently an empirical one, and it is natural to suppose that the sciences provide our best ways of answering empirical questions. In recent years many sciences have keenly stepped up to the plate, putting traditional inquiries from philosophy, religion, law, history or anthropology onto the back foot. In this lecture I query the methodological presumptions that lie behind this imperialism, and urge a more nuanced relationship between the different disciplines.

Wood Labs III: A Collaboration between Art, Design and Engineering

Thursday, November 14, 2013 - 11:30pm

Location: DCDC Lecture Room, #175

21 East 6th Street
Tempe, AZ
Contact us

Impunity Still from the Peace Accords to the Rios Montt Trial

Thursday, November 14, 2013 - 7:00pm

West Hall, Room 135

Click here to watch the recording of this lecture

Short Films Workshop

Tuesday, November 12, 2013 - 7:00pm

Business Administration C, Room 209

Presented by the U.N.A.T.C. Bucharest, Romanian Cultural Institute, and ASU, this event will feature the short films "Butterfly," "The Tell-Tale Heart," "Silence," "Day 137," "Closed Doors," and "Nightmare Dreams."

More information to come later

The Bald Soprano

Sunday, November 10, 2013 - 2:00am

The Empty Space Theatre

In collaboration with the National University of Theatre and Film (UNATC) of Bucharest, Romania's foremost theatre and film institute, ASU's School of International Letters and Cultures welcomes Romanian actors to the U.S. to perform Eugene Ionesco's "The Bald Soprano." Admission is free.

For more information
Contact: Ileana Orlich
orlich@asu.edu

Sustaining and What Sustains

Saturday, November 9, 2013 - 4:00pm

West Hall, Room 135

The theme for the 2013 Pacific Society for Women in Philosophy (PSWIP) meeting is "Sustaining and What Sustains." When we think of what needs to be sustained, we might think of the environment, communities, cultures, friendships, family, self-esteem, trust, the humanities, human and animal welfare, and ourselves as knowers and cultural producers. In light of what humanly created or natural threats does the need to be sustained arise? In sustaining what matters, what ways of relating, activities, attitudes, and socio-political principles and structures are important?

The Bald Soprano

Saturday, November 9, 2013 - 2:00am

The Empty Space Theatre

In collaboration with the National University of Theatre and Film (UNATC) of Bucharest, Romania's foremost theatre and film institute, ASU's School of International Letters and Cultures welcomes Romanian actors to the U.S. to perform Eugene Ionesco's "The Bald Soprano." Admission is free.

For more information
Contact: Ileana Orlich
Email: orlich@asu.edu

"The Next Big One: Animal Infections, Spillover, and the Threat of Pandemic," with David Quammen

Friday, November 8, 2013 - 12:30am

Marston Exploration Theater, ISTB4 — ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration

David Quammen will present "THE NEXT BIG ONE: Animal Infections, Spillover, and the Threat of Pandemic" on Thursday, November 7, 2013 as part of the Institute for Humanities Research Andrew W. Mellon Foundation /Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes funded "Humanities for the Environment" project and Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing's Distinguished Visiting Writer Series.

International Guest Lecture: Ana Silvia Monzon Monterroso

Friday, November 1, 2013 - 8:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Click here to watch Part 1 of this lecture
Click here to watch Part 2 of this lecture

Ana Silvia Monzón Monterroso is a sociologist in the School of Political Science at the University of San Carlos, Guatemala. She conducts research on human rights, citizenship and political participation, women's history, communication and gender, feminism and women's movement, ethnicity and gender.

Seed Grant Deadline

Monday, October 28, 2013 - 7:00pm

In fall and spring competitions each year, projects are selected for Seed Grant awards of up to $7,500 for individual researchers or up to $12,000 per team. These grants further advance faculty research and often improve the quality of grant proposals to external funding agencies. The Institute supports those projects that best address its mission and that have strong prospects of receiving external funding.

What's at Stake in Comprehensive Immigration Reform? Legalization, amnesty, and the rule of law

Friday, October 25, 2013 - 12:30am

Armstrong Hall, Room 116

Few issues of public policy can generate as much controversy as comprehensive immigration reform. The U.S. Senate passed a broad-ranging proposal with bipartisan support in June 2013, but the prospects for similar legislation emerging from the House are uncertain. Much of the debate turns on what is at stake. Are the 11,000,000 unathorized migrants who live in the United States "illegal aliens" or "undocumented immigrants?" Is it "legalization" or "amnesty" to offer them lawful immigration status and a path to citizenship? Does it foster or violate the "rule of law" to do so? Prof.

Free Film Screening: Elemental

Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 1:30am

Harkins Valley Art Theater

Emmanuel Vaughn-Lee
Director, Producer, and Co-composer, ELEMENTAL

Join us for a free screening of the award-winning film, ELEMENTAL. With beautiful footage shot from around the globe, this film profiles three activists from three different continents in their struggle to protect the environment.

View the trailer here.

The film's director, Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, will lead a post-film discussion.

Manifesting Literary Feminisms: A Conversation with Rachel Blau DuPlessis

Wednesday, October 23, 2013 - 11:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

ASU English's Creative Writing Program, in cooperation with the School of Social Transformation, the Institute for Humanities Research, and the Office of the Associate Dean of Faculty, presents "Manifesting Literary Feminisms: A Conversation with Rachel Blau DuPlessis."

Responsibility Under A Climate Change Mitigation Regime

Monday, October 21, 2013 - 10:00pm

Armstrong Hall, Room 226

Darrel Moellendorf, Goethe University Frankfurt, Professor of International Political Theory will be discussing conceptions of international responsibility suitable for the architecture of institutions that would distribute the costs for climate change mitigation, as in a future international climate change regime under the auspices of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. It examines justifications for two principles, the polluter-pays principle and the ability-to-pay principle.

Arlene Davila, Scholar-in-Residence Colloquium

Friday, October 18, 2013 - 7:00pm

Hayden Library, Room C-6

Arlene Davila is the Comparative Border Studies Fall 2013 Scholar-in-Residence. She is a professor of Anthropology and American Studies at New York University. Her research examines issues related to urban ethnography, the political economy of culture and media, creative economies and consumption, immigration and geographies of inequality and race. In particular, her work has focused on the ethnographic study of the local, national and global dynamics of Puerto Rican and contemporary Latino/Latin American cultural politics.

Inter-Generational Perceptions of Spirituality and Sustainability: Pilgrimage Tourism on the Ganges

Friday, October 18, 2013 - 6:30pm

POST 120, Grand Canyon Room

Join the School of Community Resources and Development and the CRD Grads Club for a luncheon presentation and discussion on the topic: Inter-generational perceptions of spirituality and sustainability: Pilgrimage Tourism on the Ganges. We will be having two presenters, Dr. Jyotsna Kalavar, Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University and Dr. Christine Buzinde, School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University in collaboration with Dr. David Manuel-Navarrete, School of Sustainability, Arizona State University and Dr.

Master Class on the Feminist Poetics of Rachel Blau DuPlessis

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 - 11:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Dr. Cynthia Hogue will be offering a Master Class on the Feminist Poetics of Rachel Blau DuPlessis a week prior to her reading and lecture. The class is scheduled for Wednesday, October 16 at 4:30 p.m. in the Social Sciences Building, Room 109.

If you are interested in attending please contact Dr. Cynthia Hogue at cynthia.hogue@asu.edu

Ethnography in the Borderlands

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 - 8:30pm

West Hall, Room 135

To watch a recording of this lecture, click here
To watch a recording of the discussion group with Arlene Davlia, click here

Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth?

Friday, October 11, 2013 - 2:00am

Changing Hands Bookstore

Alan Weiman, Laureate Associate Professor of Journalism and Latin American Studies, University of Arizona

He will be leading a discussion on his new book, Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth?

Ticket (admits two) is free when you purchase Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth? from Changing Hands Bookstore. Letter groups (printed on top of ticket) will be called at 6:00 p.m. to fill seats and designated standing room. If available, seating and standing room opens to those without tickets at 6:45 p.m.

Free Film Screening: Desert Dreams

Friday, October 11, 2013 - 1:30am

Harkins Valley Art Theater

Join us for a free screening of an award-winning film, Desert Dreams.

Desert Dreams showcases five seasons of life in the Sonoran Desert and dispels the notion that deserts are barren places. Through a score of natural sounds and dozens of musical instruments, paired with stunning footage of plants, animals and landscapes, you will experience a world filled with beauty year round.

View the film trailer here

Filmmaker Thomas Weiwandt will lead a post-film discussion.

From Operation Wetback to Operation Gatekeeper: Borders, the Border Patrol, and the Making of the California Landscape

Tuesday, October 8, 2013 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Click here to watch a recording of this lecture

Small Gestures: A Dialogue in Dance and Drawing

Monday, October 7, 2013 - 3:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

The exhibition Small Gestures is the first in a series of explorations at the intersection of dance and drawing as a dynamic site. It is rooted in the synergy between both disciplines that emerged in the twentieth century. The project examines space, time, movement, and materials from the perspectives of a choreographer and visual artist, Eileen Standley and Janice Pittsley respectively.

Tracks and traces of sepia powder reveal a particular language of intentional movement in time and space: push, pull, scrape, expand, carve, invert, scratch, pound, spiral, and retreat.

World Premiere of "A Good Death"

Saturday, October 5, 2013 - 2:30am

The Empty Space Theatre, Performing and Media Arts Building

A GOOD DEATH, sponsored by the Empty Space performance venue in the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University, opens Friday, October 4th. A panel featuring health care providers including hospice nurses follows the Friday, October 4th opening night performance. The panel is sponsored by the ASU Institute for Humanities Research and The Consortium for Science and Policy Outcomes follows the opening night. Additionally, while there is no charge to attend the performances, donations are being accepted on behalf of Hospice of the Valley.

Ocean as a Border with Rudy Guevarra, Matthew Kester, & Lily Welty

Friday, October 4, 2013 - 7:00pm

West Hall, Room 135

This series will cover the historical and contemporary Latina/o migrations to Hawai'i and how that experience helps us to rethink and redefine borders and borderlands to include the Pacific. It was made possible by an IHR seed grant and will feature the following speakers:

Digital Mapping Workshop

Friday, October 4, 2013 - 4:00pm

COOR Hall, L1-30

This workshop is currently full. If you would like to be put on a waiting list email breezy.taggart@asu.edu

Session I: Creating Digital Archives: Discussion and Tutorial
9am-11:30am, COOR Hall, L1-30

International Guest Lecture: Juliana Zambrano & Ana Velez

Thursday, October 3, 2013 - 1:00am

ASU Art Museum Auditorium

When Sergio Fajardo became the mayor of Medellin, Colombia, he sought to change the negative, violent image the city was seen as. His goal was to focus on the low-income communities, as he stated, "Our most beautiful buildings...must be in our poorest areas," he proclaimed. It was in this wake that the infrastructure and community began to flourish through the production of parks, libraries, and public transportation; crime had begun to decrease.

The Agencies of Catastrophe and Disaster

Tuesday, October 1, 2013 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Thomas Puleo, Assistant Professor, School of Politics and Global Studies
"Supra-Human Agency"

Sustainability Stories with the Solar Sewing Rover

Friday, September 27, 2013 - 7:00pm

Wrigley Hall, Breezeway

Visual artist and Arizona native Paul Nosa will join the ASU Art Museum and the Global Institute of Sustainability for a two- day sewing performance with his Solar Sewing Rover–a portable sewing machine powered by a solar panel or a bicycle with an electric generator. His performance is part of the opening weekend program for the "Crafting A Continuum: Rethinking Contemporary Craft" exhibition which opens on September 27, 2013 at the ASU Art Museum.

Seed Grant Workshop

Thursday, September 26, 2013 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Do you have a compelling transdisciplinary research idea? Are you or one of your colleagues doing research in the humanities that is transdisciplinary, collaborative, and issue-focused?

Bring your own lunch and learn more about the competitive IHR Seed Grant program, the application process, and budget instructions at our IHR Seed Grant Workshop.

Glimpses of Phoenix

Wednesday, September 25, 2013 - 1:00am

Hayden Library, Tempe campus

Phoenix's self-image is shaped in part by the idea that it has no history. There is also a persistent notion that Phoenix is a "clean" city, though considerable evidence suggests a past of police corruption and social oppression. Present-day Phoenix, easygoing and sun-drenched, is said to be a place of ever-expanding development and economic growth that guarantees an enviable lifestyle, low taxes, and unfettered personal freedom and opportunity.

Wolves, Cattle, Humans: Art, Science, and Persuasion in the Gila National Forest

Monday, September 23, 2013 - 11:00pm

Wrigley Hall, Room 481

CLAS/IHR Seed Grant
"Gila 2.0 Warding off the Wolf" is a project by Artist Marina Zurkow and Scientist Christie Leece that addresses wolf depredations as the cause of widespread livestock loss and intense emotional stress among the rural populations of Gila. Funded by a CLAS/IHR Seed Grant this lecture will focus on the research conducted in animal cognitive behavior and predator control and how this contributes to the "cattle armor system."

Rio Cancion: Sustainability Education Through Art

Wednesday, September 18, 2013 - 7:00pm

Wrigley Hall, Room 481

Julie Anand, Senior Sustainability Scholar, ASU Global Institute of Sustainability

Associate Professor, ASU School of Art, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts

In this talk, artist Julie Anand will discuss the use of art to promote sustainability education and the photography workshop she designed and led at the Honduran nonprofit, Guarama. Guaruma offers photography and computer science after-school programs to Honduran youth in an effort to instill environmental awareness.

2013 IHR/CLAS Humanities Faculty Authors’ Reception

Tuesday, September 17, 2013 - 11:00pm

Click here to view the video of this event

International Guest Lecture: Adriana Lestido

Friday, September 13, 2013 - 8:00pm

Tempe Center, 195, Tempe

In 1995, Adriana Lestido became the first Argentine photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship. Her works are exhibited in world-class museums in Argentina, the United States, France and Sweden among other countries.

"SPECFLIC 1.9" Film Screening

Friday, September 13, 2013 - 7:00pm

Marston Exploration Theater, ISTB4 building, ASU Tempe

The Center for Science and the Imagination and the Institute for Humanities Research will be hosting a screening of Adriene Jenik's film project "SPECFLIC 1.9." Following the screening their will be a Q&A with Jenik, ASU Professor and Director of the School of Art at the Herberger Institute.

Technology, Agency and Complicity: SPECFLIC 1.9

Friday, September 13, 2013 - 12:00pm

SS 109

Adriene Jenik's film "SPECFLIC 1.9" imagines the near future of the public research university. The project embraces the limitless human potential made possible through computer-enabled global network connectivity, even as it considers the cultural impact of new levels of control made possible through these very networks and protocols. Through excerpts from "SPECFLIC 1.9" Prof. Jenik will ask participants in this seminar to tease out the threads of their own present storylines to better imagine and therefore shape our shared future.

Research Networking Reception

Wednesday, September 11, 2013 - 11:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Please join us for our annual Research Networking Reception, hosted by the Institute for Humanities Research. This event offers an opportunity to learn about the 2013-14 IHR programs and meet various IHR Fellows, Seed Grant investigators and Research Cluster facilitators. This is an opportunity to network with colleagues from across the university, discover common areas of interest, and share your research projects.

Three Presentations on the Vision for the IHR Digital Humanities Seed Lab

Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 4:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

We invite you to join us for three presentations given by candidates for the position of Director, IHR Digital Humanities Seed Lab, who will articulate their vision for the Digital Humanities Seed Lab and the Digital Humanities at ASU. A Q&A session will follow each presentation.

Tuesday, August 20, 9:00a.m. - 10:30a.m.
Eric Nebeker, Acting co-Director, English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA), Lecturer, Department of English, University of California at Santa Barbara

Creative Non-Fiction Research Cluster Open Reading

Friday, April 26, 2013 - 9:30pm

SHESC 254

IHR Creative Non-Fiction Research Cluster presents an open reading

Moderated by Professor Roxanne Doty and Naomi Jackson, the event will showcase some work of the group with discussion related to the challenges and rewards of working in the area of creative non-fiction. Contact naomi.jackson@asu.edu for more information.

Honors Lecture Series: Jackie Orr presents “Slow Disaster at the Digital Edge”

Friday, April 26, 2013 - 2:30am

Marston Exploration Theater / ISTB4

Jackie Orr teaches and writes in the fields of cultural politics, technoscience and psychiatry, and critical body studies. Her book "Panic Diaries: A Genealogy of Panic Disorder" (2006) looks at how histories of militarization, cybernetics, and technoscientific desire animate the language and experience of psychic dis-ease. For the past 20 years, she has experimented with performance and textual/visual collage as alternative methods for making public memory and insurgent scholarly knowledges.

Costica Bradatan, "Living and Dying for Ideas"

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 - 10:00pm

Languages and Literatures 165

In this talk, Costica Bradatan discusses the tradition of philosophy as a “way of life” (drawing on Pierre Hadot and Michel Foucault) to set up a framework in which to understand the radical gestures by a group of philosophers (Socrates, Hypatia, Giordano Bruno, Thomas More, and Jan Patocka) who, by dying a martyr’s death, turn philosophy into a form of bodily performance. This lecture is co-sponsored with the Department of English and is free and open to the public.

Latin American Research Cluster Series: Claudio Vekstein

Friday, April 19, 2013 - 7:00pm

Language & Literature, Room 165

This presentation reviews the relationship between a rapidly changing set of social concerns in the Americas and the development of new modes of architecture and new approaches to urban design.

The Thickening Borderlands: Insurgent Mestizaje and Other Disappearances

Thursday, April 18, 2013 - 11:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

As part of a broad effort to decolonize social science, this talk challenges the predominant academic preoccupation with “illegality” and “deportability,” as well as certain critical discourses about mestizaje. Rosas calls for a critical reconsideration of certain discourses about mestizaje in light of emergent anti-border possibilities that the social majority is attempting to live across the United States and Mexico, the insurgent networks that have emerged, and the longstanding intellectual production from the US-Mexico border region that has been negated.

Sharing the Superhero: Media Franchising, Industrial Cultures, and the Marvel Entertainment Empire

Thursday, April 18, 2013 - 10:00pm

Wrigley Hall, Room 101

The Department of English's Film and Media Studies Guest Speaker Series presents Derek Johnson, Assistant Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

The Political Socialization of Youth from Immigrant Families and the Role of Community-Based Grassroots Organizing

Thursday, April 18, 2013 - 5:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

This presentation examines the political socialization of youth from immigrant families in order to advance the literature on immigrant incorporation, youth civic engagement, and voluntary associations. Discussing the results of a mixed-methods study, Terriquez contends that barriers to immigrant parents’ political engagement limit their children’s political participation, unless children gain significant political exposure from non-family sources.

World Literatures and What It Means to Be Human in the Niche of Nature, Culture, Technology

Friday, April 12, 2013 - 1:00am

Memorial Union, La Paz (242)

The 2012-2013 Ian Fletcher Memorial Lecture features Regenia Gagnier, Professor of English and Senior Fellow of the ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society (Egenis) at the University of Exeter, U.K. Her books have shaped the study of Victorian and modern culture with highly influential work on decadence, aesthetics and aestheticism, lifewriting and subjectivity, economics, individualism, and globalization.

Research Cluster Application Deadline

Tuesday, April 9, 2013 - 6:45am

The IHR facilitates and supports diverse Research Clusters at ASU. Our aim is to assist research and communication among scholars and to enrich the intellectual climate of the university. The Research Clusters may serve as an entry point for faculty to engage with the IHR. They should support activities related to the IHR mission to:

Cine en Construccion (Films in Progress): The San Sebastian (Spain) Film Festival and its Role in Shaping Latin American Film

Monday, April 8, 2013 - 10:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

The Department of English Film and Media Studies Guest Speaker Series presents a lecture by Tamara Falicov, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Film and Media Studies at University of Kansas.

Technologies of Imagination: Fifty Years Beyond Man and His Future

Friday, April 5, 2013 - 3:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

In 1963 the Ciba foundation published the proceedings of a conference on Man and His Future. The purpose of the conference was to predict the trajectories—biological, social, political and moral-- of the human evolutionary future, and to explore the corollary possibilities for (and imperative of) managing that future through biotechnological control. To this end, it gathered together scientific luminaries including Joshua Lederberg, Francis Crick, Julian Huxley and others.

Seed Grant Application Deadline

Monday, April 1, 2013 - 7:00am

In fall and spring competitions each year, projects are selected for Seed Grant awards of up to $7,500 for individual researchers or up to $12,000 per team. These grants further advance faculty research and often improve the quality of grant proposals to external funding agencies. The Institute supports those projects that best address its mission and that have strong prospects of receiving external funding.

For more information

Telling Imaginaries: Places, Histories, and the Global

Friday, March 29, 2013 - 3:00pm

West Hall, Room 135

Now that the Enlightenment dream of generating perfectly rational human persons and utterly transparent social relations has crumbled, the humanities’ focus on imaginaries has become increasingly important. On the one hand, the imaginary connects experience and the material world and, on the other hand, it intervenes into those realities through memory, desire and creative expression. The imaginary limits of time and space are not simply transcended. Rather, the effects of the imagination become immanent in the world.

Dipesh Chakrabarty and "Climate Change and the Historical Imagination"

Thursday, March 28, 2013 - 11:30pm

Wrigley Hall 101

Please join us for a lecture by Dipesh Chakrabarty, the Lawrence A. Kimpton Distinguished Service Professor in History, South Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. Chakrabarty suggests that man-made global warming spells the collapse of the age-old humanist distinction between natural history and human history. The discipline of history exists on the assumption that our past, present, and future are connected by a certain continuity of human experience, yet the current crisis of climate change disrupts this idea.

Their Bones Keep Them Moving: Helena Maria Viramontes's Under The Feet of Jesus and the Cross-Currents of U.S. Environmentalism

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 10:00pm

Languages & Literature, Room 316

Environmental studies have traditionally explored relationships between culture and the environment to create an earth-centered scholarly vision. However, certain strains of environmental thought have emphasized privileged perspectives over those of people of color, the poor, and the formerly colonized. This talk focuses on countervailing strains of environmental thought in contemporary Latina/o literature that speak powerfully to environmental justice frameworks. David J.

Unrolling the Scrolls: Chinese Painting in Context

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 - 8:30pm

Phoenix Art Museum, Whiteman Hall

This symposium is presented by The Marilyn and Roy Papp ASU-Phoenix Art Museum-Asian Arts Council, Chinese Painting Program, with additional support from The Institute for Humanities Research at ASU.

A Study of Cultural Exchange between Korea and China during the 18th and 19th Centuries

Monday, March 25, 2013 - 11:30pm

Language & Literature, Room 102

In this talk, Min Jung proposes a new resource for studying cultural exchange between Korea and China during the 18th and 19th centuries by introducing the Hujitsuka Chikashi collection of the Harvard-Yenching Library. Fujitsuka Chikashi (藤塚隣 1879–1948) was a Japanese scholar who specialized in the Qianlong (乾隆) and Jiaqing (嘉慶) School of Qing China. Around 1926 when he was appointed as a professor of Chinese philosophy at Keijo Imperial University (Seoul National University), he collected a large number of books concerning the Qianlong and Jiaqing School in Korea and China.

Preserving the Search for Human Origins

Thursday, March 21, 2013 - 10:30pm

Hayden Library, C-6

Knowledge is a valuable thing. Saving that knowledge for future generations, well, that takes real money! A seed grant from the Institute for Humanities Research is helping the Institute of Human Origins (IHO) and project collaborator, University Libraries, evaluate and create a work plan to catalog a major collection of papers from IHO Founding Director Donald C. Johanson and the Institute of Human Origins for use by scholars in the future.

Public Lectures with Leo Chavez

Wednesday, March 20, 2013 - 6:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Professor Chavez received his Ph.D. from Stanford University and is currently a professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine.

Out of the Haiku Pan and Into the Sijo: Poetry Reading & Workshop

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 - 11:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Robert C. Staley Distinguished Visiting Professor in East Asian Studies

A Public Literacies Symposium

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 - 7:00pm

Memorial Union Gold Room 207

Public engagement has the potential to invigorate how and where writing instruction is conceived and practiced. This symposium is designed to cast imagination around the question: How precisely so? And, How so, here in Phoenix?

A Public Literacies Symposium

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 - 5:30pm

Memorial Union Gold Room 207

Public engagement has the potential to invigorate how and where writing instruction is conceived and practiced. This symposium is designed to cast imagination around the question: How precisely so? And, How so, here in Phoenix?

A Public Literacies Symposium

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 - 4:00pm

Memorial Union Gold Room 207

Public engagement has the potential to invigorate how and where writing instruction is conceived and practiced. This symposium is designed to cast imagination around the question: How precisely so? And, How so, here in Phoenix?

A Public Literacies Symposium

Monday, March 18, 2013 - 5:30pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Public engagement has the potential to invigorate how and where writing instruction is conceived and practiced. This symposium is designed to cast imagination around the question: How precisely so? And, How so, here in Phoenix?

A Public Literacies Symposium

Monday, March 18, 2013 - 4:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

Public engagement has the potential to invigorate how and where writing instruction is conceived and practiced. This symposium is designed to cast imagination around the question: How precisely so? And, How so, here in Phoenix?

Theatre and Attitudes

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 - 9:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Theatre and Attitudes is a transdisciplinary study between Psychology and Theatre designed to gather and analyze empirical data to investigate the role of live and mediated performance in altering implicit associations. This project began with a question: How, if at all, can viewing performance change our attitudes, specifically in regard to previously held stereotypes?

Multispecies Cosmopolitics: Staying with the Trouble

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 - 12:30am

Carson Ballroom of Old Main

As the IHR’s 2013 Distinguished Lecturer, Donna Haraway, Distinguished Professor Emerita of the History of Consciousness Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz and author of "Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: the Reinvention of Nature," called upon her audience to work, play and think in terms of multispecies cosmopolitics, a new approach to recuperating the Terrapolis on which we live.

Call for Fellows: The Humanities and Home

Tuesday, March 5, 2013 - 6:45am

When Dorothy Gale utters the last line of The Wizard of Oz, “There’s no place like home,” there seems little doubt that she speaks out of her joy at being safely ensconced on her family’s farm in America’s Heartland. However, Dorothy’s simple phrase is open to a wide variety of interpretations because of one word—home—that can connote security, belonging, memory, and comfort, or arouse feelings of dread, alienation, and pain.

Subvention Funding Application Deadline

Tuesday, March 5, 2013 - 6:45am

The IHR will make available a limited number grants up to $1,500 to assist full-time tenured and tenure-track humanities faculty with subvention costs. Priority will be given to those who have not gotten previous support for publication from the IHR. Criteria for awards will also include the stature of the press and the scholarly record of the faculty member.

A Storied Landscape

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 8:00pm

West Hall 135

We make sense of the places we live through the stories we tell about ourselves, our place, our past, and our future. This roundtable brings together artists, activists and scholars to explore the role of story-telling in creating identity, understanding, and sense of place in the borderlands. Panelists will explore the human landscape of the borderlands through personal and family stories, poetry, and performance.

Rhetorical Listening and Diversity in Higher Education

Thursday, February 28, 2013 - 11:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Rhetorical listening is a conscious stance of “openness” aimed at facilitating cross-cultural communication about any topic; it is a posture of listening that rejects the traditional practice of listening for ways to argue against or discount, and instead advocates listening as an ethical responsibility to understand the discourses of others. As a rhetorical strategy, its aim is to assist individuals during moments of communicative disconnect--i.e.

Crossing the Language Barrier: Second Language Speakers and Use on Popular American Television

Saturday, February 23, 2013 - 10:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

This talk takes a panoramic view of how television integrates and represents recent renderings of second language (L2) speakers and use, from non-native speakers using English to the acquisition and use of other languages by English-speaking characters, in varied shows from Xiaolin Showdown to Modern Family, from Saturday Night Live’s “La Policía Mexicana” to How I Met Your Mother. The tension in these countervailing trends is emblematic of the ways in which attitudes about L2 speakers and use have fractured the U.S.

Gender and Sustainability Book Launch

Friday, February 22, 2013 - 4:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

This event celebrates the publication of the book “Gender and Sustainability: Lessons from Asia and Latin America,” which began as a research cluster at the IHR. The book was published in November by the University of Arizona Press and deals with the struggles of women and men to negotiate such forces as global environmental change, economic development pressures, discrimination and stereotyping about the roles of women and men, and diminishing access to natural resources—not in the abstract but in everyday life.

Donna Haraway, 2013 IHR Distinguished Lecturer, Reading Group

Thursday, February 21, 2013 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

In preparation for the arrival of the Institute for Humanities Research’s 2013 Distinguished Lecturer, Donna Haraway, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in four-parts that will be led by Joni Adamson, Associate Professor of English and Environmental Humanities, School of Letters and Sciences, and Ron Broglio, Associate Professor of English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Call for Fellows: The Humanities and Home

Tuesday, February 19, 2013 - 6:45am

When Dorothy Gale utters the last line of The Wizard of Oz, “There’s no place like home,” there seems little doubt that she speaks out of her joy at being safely ensconced on her family’s farm in America’s Heartland. However, Dorothy’s simple phrase is open to a wide variety of interpretations because of one word—home—that can connote security, belonging, memory, and comfort, or arouse feelings of dread, alienation, and pain.

Seed Grant Workshop

Thursday, February 14, 2013 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Do you have a compelling transdisciplinary research idea? Are you or one of your colleagues doing research in the humanities that is transdisciplinary, collaborative, and issue-focused?

Come learn more about the competitive IHR Seed Grant program, the application process, and budget instructions at our IHR Seed Grant Workshop.

Imaginatio(n)ow Opening Reception

Friday, February 8, 2013 - 9:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Please join us for the opening reception of the IHR's annual art exhibit, this year themed Imaginatio(n)ow.

Donna Haraway, 2013 IHR Distinguished Lecturer, Reading Group

Thursday, February 7, 2013 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

In preparation for the arrival of the Institute for Humanities Research’s 2013 Distinguished Lecturer, Donna Haraway, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in four-parts that will be led by Joni Adamson, Associate Professor of English and Environmental Humanities, School of Letters and Sciences, and Ron Broglio, Associate Professor of English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Collaboration Roundtable

Wednesday, February 6, 2013 - 6:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Join us for a roundtable discussion of interdisciplinary research. The event will feature the directors of two projects talking on their work and the collaborative process.

Performance and the Text

Tuesday, January 29, 2013 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Gitta Honegger, Professor, School of Theatre and Film
"Translation in Performance/Translation as Performance"

Stephen Greenblatt Reading Group: New Historicism and Its Discontents

Sunday, January 27, 2013 - 6:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

In preparation for the Institute for Humanities Research’s 2014 Distinguished Lecturer, Stephen Greenblatt, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in four-parts that will be led by:

Cora Fox, Associate Professor of English and Associate Director, IHR
Erin McCarthy, Assistant Director, ACMRS
Mike Tueller, Associate Professor of Greek, SILC

Donna Haraway, 2013 IHR Distinguished Lecturer, Reading Group

Thursday, January 24, 2013 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

In preparation for the arrival of the Institute for Humanities Research’s 2013 Distinguished Lecturer, Donna Haraway, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in four-parts that will be led by Joni Adamson, Associate Professor of English and Environmental Humanities, School of Letters and Sciences, and Ron Broglio, Associate Professor of English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Theorizing Environmental Justice: The Expanding Sphere of a Discourse

Thursday, January 24, 2013 - 4:00pm

Wrigley Hall, Room 481

Join us for a lecture in which David Schlosberg, director of the Sydney Network on Climate Change and Society and professor of Environmental Politics at the University of Sydney, examines the development of environmental justice -both the idea and its coverage- as a central concern for both activists and academics. He will explore how early conceptions of environmental justice pushed beyond many boundaries by challenging the very notion of “environment,” examining the construction of range of injustices, and illustrating the potential of pluralistic conceptions of social justice.

Food Cultures for Sustainability

Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 11:30pm

Old Main, Carson Ballroom

Historically, most peoples' choices around food have been shaped by corporations, social structures and far-off cultures. In a world where nearly a billion people are under-nourished and almost two billion are overweight, we desperately need visions of how to eat, and also how to grow and distribute food in a sustainable way. Luckily, such ideas are alive and well, from Malawi to Canada.

Latin American Research Cluster Series: José Bernardi

Friday, January 18, 2013 - 7:00pm

Language & Literature, Room 165

José Bernardi is associate professor of design in the ASU Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. In this presentation Bernardi will talk about Medellin, Colombia "a model of how a city can be transformed when architecture and social policy work in tandem." A new generation of Latin American designers and political figures continues to anchor their work on social engagement. Combining a renewed sense of maturity and imaginative pragmatism to respond to the specific challenges and needs of large metropolitan areas, their work is inventive and public oriented.

Fellows Program Workshop

Thursday, January 17, 2013 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

The IHR ASU Fellows program provides funding for either individual tenured or tenure-track faculty or research teams (two to three faculty) to engage in a year of research related to the annual theme, share their research with the academic community (via lectures, a conference or symposium), and produce a strong application for a large external grant.

Nominations for 2013 IHR Transdisciplinary Book Award

Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - 6:45am

The annual book award honors a work of academic non-fiction by an Arizona State University humanities faculty member on any campus. To be eligible, books must be written in English, published in 2011 or 2012, and written or co-written by a tenured or tenure-track, full-time ASU faculty member whose work reflects the finest contemporary transdisciplinary humanities-based scholarship on any topic.

Latin America, Human Rights and Transitional Justice

Friday, December 7, 2012 - 7:00pm

Languages & Literature, Room 165

Why Latin America is the Most Significant Region for Integrating Human Rights and Transitional Justice and What this Means for Understanding the Value and Limitations of the Global Moral/Legal Discourse.

ASU Community Well-Being Collaborative

Thursday, December 6, 2012 - 11:00pm

A.E. England Building & The Mercado Center, Downtown Phoenix Campus

The Social Innovation and Community Development IHR Research Cluster will be hosting a special event as part of the ASU Community Well-Being Collaborative. Please join on Thursday, December 6 beginning at 4 p.m. for poster presentations by Barrett, The Honors College students and graduate students from the School of Community Resources & Development on the topics of happiness and well-being. At 5 there will be a reception, followed by a keynote lecture as part of the Barrett Honors Lecture Series by Laura Musikanski from Seattle's Happiness Initiative.

Donna Haraway, 2013 IHR Distinguished Lecturer, Reading Group

Thursday, November 29, 2012 - 7:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

In preparation for the arrival of the Institute for Humanities Research’s 2013 Distinguished Lecturer, Donna Haraway, the IHR is hosting a reading/discussion group in four-parts that will be led by Joni Adamson, Associate Professor of English and Environmental Humanities, School of Letters and Sciences, and Ron Broglio, Associate Professor of English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

A Reading from "Petropolis: A Novel" and "Magic Barrel," a Graphic Novel in Progress

Wednesday, November 28, 2012 - 11:30pm

West Hall, Room 135

Anya Ulinich's debut novel, Petropolis, is a satire and love story about Sasha Goldberg, a biracial, Jewish, socially maladjusted "child of the intelligentsia" from the Siberian town of Asbestos 2. Sasha's father takes off for the U.S., leaving her to navigate adolescence under the shadow of her overbearing mother. When following her heart gets her into trouble, Sasha leaves Russia as a mail-order bride and lands in suburban Arizona. Soon, she escapes and embarks on a misadventure-filled journey across America in search of her father.

Opening the Geese Book

Tuesday, November 27, 2012 - 3:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Please join us for the launch of Opening the Geese Book!

The Geese Book is a lavishly and whimsically illuminated, two-volume gradual that contains the mass liturgy for the entire church year. It was created between 1503 and 1510 in Nuremberg, Germany and can now be found in the Pierpont Morgan Library, New York City.

Performance as Emergence

Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Grisha Coleman, Assistant Professor, School of Arts, Media and Engineering
"Hybrid Place: Interface, Performance, Environment"

2012-13 Art Exhibit: Call for Entries

Monday, November 12, 2012 - 5:00pm

Imaginatio(n)ow
February 1 - April 26, 2013

The Institute for Humanities Research (IHR) at Arizona State University is seeking artistic entries that address the theme of the Imagination/Imaginary for its fifth annual contemporary art exhibition. At the IHR we strive to advance scholarly work that contributes to productive social dialogue and makes a difference in the world. We believe that art works are an important part of that dialogue.

Celebrating Italy: an International Guest Lecture by Alessandro Falassi

Tuesday, November 6, 2012 - 8:30pm

Languages & Literature, Room 274

Professor Falassi, an eminent Folklorist and Anthropologist from Italy, will talk about events celebrated in Italy through the centuries, some of them dating back to the Middle Ages. A short video and discussion will follow the talk.

For more information, contact Pier Baldini at pbaldini@asu.edu.

This event is co-sponsored by: School of International Letters and Cultures, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Institute for Humanities Research, and Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

Queen of Flowers and Pearls

Friday, October 26, 2012 - 2:30am

Coor Hall, Room 170

“Through my story you can see how history can pass through people’s lives." - Gabriella Ghermandi

Lying: The Making of the World

Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 6:00pm

Memorial Union, Pima Room 218

Come explore the motivations, processes, and implications of telling lies with cutting-edge scholars in the liberal arts and sciences.

This provocative event will create new understandings about how lying shapes and reshapes our personal lives and the biological, psychological, cultural, and political underpinnings of the world. Seating is limited. Registration is free. Priority will be given to faculty and graduate students.

For more information, contact liars@asu.edu.

America’s Home

Friday, October 12, 2012 - 6:45pm

Social Sciences, Room 105

AMÉRICA’S HOME is the story of América "Meca" Sorrentini-Blaut, a feisty Puerto Rican woman in her 70's, and her fight against developers intent on bulldozing her community and family's historic home. Her story is one of many tales of resistance against rampant greed taking place all across Puerto Rico and on the mainland. This inspiring documentary is as much about displacement and empire as it is about the transformative power of the cultural arts, community and belonging.

A Winged Angel Alive and Aloft

Friday, October 12, 2012 - 5:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

In the late-Middle Ages, a new image of Francis of Assisi began to emerge: an apocalyptic figure whose coming and deeds were read into the book of the Apocalypse and prophetic literature. By the time the New World was discovered, those eschatological, millennial, and utopian aspects of the saint and his friars had increased, and they acted as a prism through which the evangelization of the Aztecs and Incas was viewed. Later the figure of Francis of Assisi merged with indigenous myths in Mexico and the Andes.

Theatre and Attitudes

Thursday, October 11, 2012 - 9:00pm

Social Science, Room 109

Theatre and Attitudes is a transdisciplinary study between psychology and theatre designed to gather and analyze empirical data to investigate the role of live and mediated performance in altering implicit associations. The studies will determine if spectators experience measurable change in stereotypes.

Join us for a performance where we invite the audience to complete a survey and participate in a discussion.

Performance and the Ritual of Consumption

Tuesday, October 2, 2012 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Rachel Bowditch, Assistant Professor of Theatre and Film at the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts
"Not For Sale: 'Burning Man' and the Gift Economy"

Chunky: The Making of a Social Activist

Monday, October 1, 2012 - 6:00pm

Memorial Union, Alumni Lounge

Admission by RSVP only

'The Hydrants are Open:' Latinos and Broadway in the 21st Century

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

In this opening talk to the series, David Román examines Lin Manuel Miranda's Tony-award winning musical “In the Heights” in the context of the shifting cultural politics of race and ethnicity in the 21st century. The talk offers a historical context for the success of the musical and, by extension, the growing opportunities for Latinos on Broadway.

Creative Non-Fiction Research Cluster

Friday, September 21, 2012 - 9:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

The purpose of this research cluster is to examine ways of making academic writing more meaningful for a wide public as well as for ourselves as scholars and publishing artists.

Within many disciplines in the humanities there remains a strong expectation to produce academic writing that is presented in a detached manner, making extensive reference to existing theories as a means for justification, and often using esoteric jargon of the field. Such writing is expected for tenure purposes, and is believed to be of a higher order than other modes of communication.

Multi-sided Violence in the Lives of Women in Guatemala

Friday, September 21, 2012 - 7:00pm

Languages & Literature, Room 165

"Multi-sided Violence in the Lives of Women in Guatemala"
Presented by Cecilia Menjivar, Professor, School of Social and Family Dynamics, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

2012 IHR/CLAS Humanities Faculty Authors' Reception

Tuesday, September 18, 2012 - 11:00pm

Please join us to recognize and celebrate the substantial body of research reflected in publications by humanities faculty at ASU.

Being Human in a Post-human World

Tuesday, September 11, 2012 - 11:00pm

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

What does it mean to be human in a world that works at a scale and speed beyond human comprehension? Scientific and technological advancements develop at speeds to which we cannot attend. Information develops at an exponential rate. Medicine targets our brain chemistry and our longevity and, from intelligent mechanical prosthetics to xenotransplants, affects who we are. In such a world, do we change what it means to be human? How do we fit in such a world?

Arizona Humanities Festival: American Jukebox

Friday, June 29, 2012 - 5:00pm

Application materials must be submitted by June 29

The Arizona Humanities Festival is a vibrant celebration of the humanities that engages the imagination, explores ideas, and excited people to learn more about the world we share.

Vital Voices

Thursday, June 21, 2012 - 6:30pm

Arizona Latino Arts & Cultural Center, 147 E. Adams, Phoenix, AZ 85004

Bring a favorite quote, passage, essay or poem to an evening of discussion, performance, and sharing.

Facilitated by Marcelino Quinonez and performances by local artists.

This event is part of ASU's Project Humanities, in collaboration with the ASU Herberger Institute's Performance in the Borderlands and Savvy Pen consultants. It is sponsored and hosted by the Arizona Latino Arts & Cultural Center.

It's Not Just Black and White: A Video and Mediated Performance

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 - 7:00pm

Whiteman Hall, Phoenix Art Museum

Please join us for a special screening presented in conjunction with Gregory Sale’s exhibition Beware! Artwork (and modest proposal for it) Ahead! at the Phoenix Art Museum. This video and performance grew out of Gregory’s 2011 Social Studies residency exhibition at the ASU Art Museum, which created a framework in which to consider the criminal justice system in Arizona. Developed through a number of public/private partnerships with different ASU departments, government agencies, and community organizations, it greatly enhanced the Museum's role as a vital gathering place.

Human Experience

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 - 6:00pm

South Mountain Community Library, 7050 S. 24th St. Phoenix, AZ 85042

Human Experience is the second film in the summer film series addressing the question, "Are we losing our humanity?" Please come and join us for another excellent film and discussion! This event is presented in partnership with ASU Center for Film, Media, and Popular Culture, ASU Emeritus College Faculty of the Humanities, the Phoenix Public Library, and Seek First Entertainment.

Summer Film Series

Wednesday, May 16, 2012 - 6:00pm

Burton Barr Central Library

Project Humanities presents Life In a Day. The first film in a three part series that explores the question, "Are we losing our humanity?" A discussion with ASU faculty and community scholars will follow the screening.

Life In a Day Movie Trailer

The Second Annual Central Arizona Writing Program

Monday, May 14, 2012 - 9:30am

Memorial Union, Arizona Ballroom (221)

Brought to you by the Central Arizona Writing Project (CAWP) in the Department of English at Arizona State University.

Featuring:
René Colato Laínez, Multicultural children's book author
Myrlin Hepworth, Slam poet and teaching artist
Neal A. Lester, Scholar in African American children's literature
Carolivia Herron, Scholar and children's book author
Conrad Storad, Science and nature children's book author
Ray Villareal, Young adult novelist

Cite and Delight:Citation Management Inside Out

Thursday, April 19, 2012 - 3:00pm

LL65.1

Join us for a 90-minute workshop to learn about four popular citation managers, and how they can help you stay organized while doing your research.

  • Build your own collection
  • Generate citation lists in a variety of styles
  • Share your research noted and collaborate with others

Featuring Rachel Leket-Mor, Religious Studies Librarian, and Rene Tanner, Life Sciences Librarian.

R.S.V.P. by April 16 to Rachel Leket-Mor or Rene Tanner.

Cite and Delight: Citation Management Inside Out

Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - 10:00am

Thursday, April 19, 2012 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm - LL65.1

Join us for a 90-minute workshop to learn about four popular citation managers, and how they can help you stay organized while doing your research.

  • Build your own collection
  • Generate citation lists in a variety of styles
  • Share your research noted and collaborate with others

Featuring Rachel Leket-Mor, Religious Studies Librarian, and Rene Tanner, Life Sciences Librarian.

R.S.V.P. by April 16 to Rachel Leket-Mor or Rene Tanner.

At Home In the Desert

Friday, April 13, 2012 - 7:00pm

South Mountain Community College, Black Box Theater, 7050 S. 24th St. Phoenix, 85042

Join us for an evening of music, dance and dialogue. “At Home in the Desert: Youth Engagement and Place” invites you to join us for a gathering featuring performances by The Warner A. Gabel Branch of the Boys & Girls Club of Metropolitan Phoenix, South Mountain High School, and Arizona State University Herberger Institute students. This program will explore what it means to live in this desert city as individuals and members of community.

[Im]migration and Movement: People, Ideas and Social Worlds

Friday, April 13, 2012 - 8:30am

University Club, Tempe campus

Today’s politically charged attention to immigration suggests that it is primarily a matter of protecting borders and controlling the entry of “aliens.” Other aspects of the concept are typically ignored, including the fact that the history of the human race is in some sense a history of movement—of ideas, resources, goods, and political and economic activities, as well as of populations. Indeed, it may be that migration and movement lie at the core of what it means to be human.

The Future of Food: In the Desert and Beyond

Monday, April 2, 2012 - 5:30pm

Wrigley Hall, Tempe Campus

Food justice involves every human constituency from farm worker and farmer to urban consumer, and involves competition for access to virtually every social and natural resource of the Earth. Families and clans, indigenous as well as diaspora cultures negotiate their identities through select foods, both traditional and transitory.

IHR Seed Grant Funding Application Deadline April 2

Monday, April 2, 2012 - 8:30am

In fall and spring competitions each year, projects are selected for Seed Grant awards of up to $7,500 for individual researchers or up to $12,000 per team. These grants further advance faculty research and often improve the quality of grant proposals to external funding agencies. The Institute supports those projects that best address its mission and that have strong prospects of receiving external funding.

Unrolling the Scrolls

Wednesday, March 28, 2012 - 2:00pm

Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85004

The Institute for Humanities Research at ASU and the Marilyn and Roy Papp ASU - Phoenix Art Museum - Asian Arts Council Chinese Painting Program present a two-day event: Unrolling the Scrolls, with lectures by Dr. Richard Vinograd, the Christensen Fund Professor in Asian Art in the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University.

Homegrown Nativism or Corporate Profits?

Wednesday, March 28, 2012 - 11:45am

Social Sciences Building, Room 109

In the recent spate of state level immigration restrictionist activities, questions have arisen about the role of the private detention industry in immigration politics at the local level. While elites and interest groups may advocate for these measures, the initiatives, to move forward, require home-grown nativism. Nativists utilized the detention industry as much as the reverse.

“Migration Interrupted: Rights, Freedom, Opportunism, and the Controversy over U.S. Immigration Policy”

Thursday, March 8, 2012 - 4:30pm

“Migration Interrupted: Rights, Freedom, Opportunism, and the Controversy over U.S. Immigration Policy”

Coco Fusco, an interdisciplinary artist, writer, and the Director of Intermedia Initiatives at Parsons The New School for Design, spoke on the other side of immigration—those who don’t make it to the U.S. because of interference by the U.S. government or their home government.

ASU Fellows Application Deadline March 5

Monday, March 5, 2012 - 9:15am

The IHR Fellows programs brings together ASU faculty and visiting scholars to pursue research and writing in an environment designed to be stimulating and supportive. Fellows will be asked to contribute to the general enrichment of humanities scholarship by attending seminars and holding public events related to their research topics.

The 2012-2013 fellows theme is:

Subvention Funding Application Deadline March 5

Monday, March 5, 2012 - 9:15am

The IHR will make available a limited number grants up to $1,500 to assist full-time tenured and tenure-track humanities faculty with subvention costs. Priority will be given to those who have not gotten previous support for publication from the IHR. Criteria for awards will also include the stature of the press and the scholarly record of the faculty member.

Digital Humanities Lecture

Monday, February 27, 2012 - 2:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

The IHR is excited to announce the launch of its new Digital Humanities Initiative. Recognizing the continued impact that digital resources, tools, and methodological practices are having within all facets of humanities research and instruction, the Institute for Humanities Research has formed an initiative to promote and support these efforts among ASU humanities' faculty.

Multiple Voices, Multiple Histories: An IHR Seed Grant Symposium

Saturday, February 25, 2012 - 9:00am

Memorial Union Ventana A (241A), Tempe campus

During World War II, the United States built ten internment camps to incarcerate Japanese American citizens. The only two located on American Indian land were in the state of Arizona: the reservations of the Gila River Indian Community and the Colorado River Indian Tribes. The U.S. Army built makeshift barracks to house the thousands of suspected enemy aliens on their lands. The WRA also used a former Navajo Boarding School as a Citizen’s Isolation Center.

ASU and the Digital Humanities

Thursday, February 23, 2012 - 1:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

The IHR is excited to announce the launch of its new Digital Humanities Initiative. Recognizing the continued impact that digital resources, tools, and methodological practices are having within all facets of humanities research and instruction, the Institute for Humanities Research has formed an initiative to promote and support these efforts among ASU humanities' faculty.

IHR Visiting Fellows Application Deadline February 20

Monday, February 20, 2012 - 10:00am

The IHR Fellows programs brings together ASU faculty and visiting scholars to pursue research and writing in an environment designed to be stimulating and supportive. Fellows will be asked to contribute to the general enrichment of humanities scholarship by attending seminars and holding public events related to their research topics.

The 2012-2013 fellows theme is:

Journalism and the Humanities: Sources of Estrangement, Future Prospects for Collaboration

Friday, February 17, 2012 - 8:30am

Social Sciences, Room 109

What is lost in journalism and the humanities when the two are estranged? What do consumers lose from journalism when it is estranged from matters of the humanities? The IHR has put together a panel of six experts from journalism and the humanities to delve into the ever-decreasing role that the humanities play in the telling of current events.

Breakfast and mid-morning refreshments will be provided.

8:30 a.m. - Continental Breakfast

Contemporary Research in Transnational Feminist Studies

Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 3:00pm

West Hall, Room 135, Tempe campus

Professor Minoo Moallem is currently working on a book manuscript entitled Nation as a Transnational Commodity, which is focused on the commodification of the nation through consumptive production and circulation of commodities such as the Persian carpet. Her other research includes a project about Iran-Iraq war movies and masculinity, and a project on material and visual cultures of religion.

Immigration, Migration and Movement Opening Reception

Friday, February 3, 2012 - 1:30pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Today’s politically charged attention to immigration suggests that it is primarily a matter of protecting borders and controlling the entry of “aliens.” Other aspects of the concept are typically ignored, including the fact that the history of the human race is in some sense a history of movement—of ideas, resources, goods, and political and economic activities, as well as of populations. Indeed, it may be that migration and movement lie at the core of what it means to be human.

The Color of Shakespeare

Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 4:00pm

Galvin Playhouse, ASU Tempe

A multidisciplinary team of scholars from ASU has partnered with the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, one of the nation’s oldest and most diverse regional classical theatres, to investigate how audiences respond to actors of color playing Shakespearean roles. The symposium will feature talks by Lue Morgan Douthit, the Director of Literary Development and Dramaturgy at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, and OSF Associate Producer Claudia Alick. Veteran OSF actors will give an acting demonstration and participate in a panel discussion about playing Shakespeare.

Stolen Rhetoric

Monday, January 30, 2012 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Keith Miller, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
"Mangling Martin Luther King: How to Oppress the Poor While Hijacking Affirmative Action"

The Diabetes of Democracy

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 - 12:00pm

ASU Farmer's Market, Cady Mall

Please join Mero Cocinero Karimi and his culinary comrades from "The People's Cook" for a tasty interactive food experience! Karimi will do a cooking demonstration using local ingredients and will share a presentation on the IHR's Diabetes of Democracy project, a storytelling and performance project promoting cultural cooking as a revolutionary movement to combat the rising epidemic of type 2 diabetes.

Literary Insights

Monday, November 14, 2011 - 12:00pm

Social Science Room 109

Deb Clark, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

The Limits of Reason

Wednesday, October 5, 2011 - 12:00pm

Social Science Room 109

Joel Gereboff, Religious Studies, SHPRS

What Makes Us Human? Visual Thinking and Different Kinds of Minds

Tuesday, March 1, 2011 - 5:30pm

Temple Grandin, one of Time Magazine’s 2010 list of 100 Most Influential People, is an animal behavioral scientist, a bestselling author and a Professor in the Department of Animal Science at Colorado State University. Grandin was diagnosed with autism as a toddler in 1950, learning to speak at age three-and-a-half with the aid of speech therapy and early intervention. She first spoke in public about autism and her own experiences in the mid-1980s.

Respresentation

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 - 12:00pm

SS 109

"Disciplinary Fault Lines" -The 2010-11 IHR Faculty Seminar Series focuses on what it means to do disciplinary and inter-/transdisciplinary work in the Humanities. At the core of the series is the issue of disciplinary fault lines—areas within disciplinary frameworks that point to the perceived limits of that discipline. How do we know when we’ve reached the limits of an idea, or have exhausted all avenues of inquiry from within a disciplinary frame? How do disciplines look differently at the same topic or question?

The Queer

Monday, November 15, 2010 - 12:00pm

SS 109

"Disciplinary Fault Lines" -The 2010-11 IHR Faculty Seminar Series focuses on what it means to do disciplinary and inter-/transdisciplinary work in the Humanities. At the core of the series is the issue of disciplinary fault lines—areas within disciplinary frameworks that point to the perceived limits of that discipline. How do we know when we’ve reached the limits of an idea, or have exhausted all avenues of inquiry from within a disciplinary frame? How do disciplines look differently at the same topic or question?

Freedom

Monday, September 20, 2010 - 12:00pm

"Disciplinary Fault Lines" -The 2010-11 IHR Faculty Seminar Series focuses on what it means to do disciplinary and inter-/transdisciplinary work in the Humanities. At the core of the series is the issue of disciplinary fault lines—areas within disciplinary frameworks that point to the perceived limits of that discipline. How do we know when we’ve reached the limits of an idea, or have exhausted all avenues of inquiry from within a disciplinary frame? How do disciplines look differently at the same topic or question?

The Humanities as Power: Law, Poetry, Jazz and Civic Engagement

Thursday, February 4, 2010 - 5:30pm

Patricia J. Williams is James L. Dohr Professor of Law at Columbia University. A graduate of Wellesley College and Harvard Law School, she has served on faculties of the University of Wisconsin School of Law, Harvard University's Women's Studies Program, and the City University of New York Law School at Queen's College. She is the recipient of the Alumnae Achievement Award from Wellesley, the Graduate Society Medal from Harvard, and the MacArthur foundation “genius” grant.

Crucial Contexts: Sustainability

Wednesday, January 27, 2010 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Rhetoric and the Quest for Sustainable Communities: Oceanic Islands: Peter Goggin, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Crucial Contexts: Human Rights

Wednesday, November 4, 2009 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

A Philosopher Looks at the Trouble with Truth Commissions: Margaret Walker, School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies

Crucial Contexts: War

Wednesday, October 7, 2009 - 12:00pm

Social Sciences, Room 109

Historians and 'Inventions' of War: Mark von Hagen, School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies

Living with the Humanities

Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 5:00pm

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is University Professor and the Director of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University. B.A. English (Honors), Presidency College, Calcutta, 1959. Ph.D. Comparative Literature, Cornell University, 1967. D. Litt, University of Toronto, 1999; D. Litt, Univeristy of London, 2003.

The Humanities and the Limits of the Human

Monday, January 28, 2008 - 5:00pm

To view this lecture click here

After the Humanities

Thursday, March 29, 2007 - 7:00pm

Marjorie Garber, William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of English and American Literature and Language and of Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University, where she is also Chair of the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies and Director of the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts Harvard University.

Academic Norms and Critical Inquiry: Challenges for Difficult Times

Thursday, March 2, 2006 - 5:00pm

Recent debates suggest that "academic freedom" is a concept used by both liberal and conservative intellectuals, characterizing very different ideals for academic education. But what kind of "freedom" is at stake for both of these positions? Is there a critical position to be formulated that sidesteps the impasses produced by both liberal and conservative views on this question? And how do debates on academic freedom fit into larger political struggles over state control and surveillance as well as new rights discourses?