Fellows

ASU faculty members engage in a year of research related to the annual theme.

 

The ASU IHR Fellows program provides funding for tenured or tenure-track faculty, as well as to other faculty eligible for a research release. Fellows may apply as individuals or as a team to engage in a year of research related to the annual theme, to share their research with the academic community, and to produce a strong application for an external grant. 

Successful proposals for the Fellows program will outline a rich scholarly project rooted in the humanities that will benefit from interdisciplinary conversations and readings, that has clear and feasible outcomes for the fellowship year, and that has the potential to be funded by outside agencies.

Fellowships provide funds toward one course buyout (in the spring semester) for each faculty member as well as research funds of $2500 per faculty member. 

 

2019-2020 Theme: Borders and Boundaries

Disciplinary, spatial, ideological, virtual—the boundaries we imagine, construct, and confront are multiple and multi-faceted. Boundaries exclude and include; borders connect and separate. Borders and boundaries are created by states and communities, by institutions and individuals; they shift and change over time. What functions do borders and boundaries serve? Who makes and guards them? Who confronts and crosses them? Who do they serve and who do they limit? How does our current attention to borders and boundaries in this age of globalization reflect new worries and how does it echo old ones? The Institute for Humanities Research invites scholars to propose research projects that address these questions or any others related to the topic of “Borders and Boundaries.”

        

                                

Fellows Projects

20 Generations Short: The Making of America’s Racial Wealth Gap, 1619–2019

Calvin Schermerhorn | Professor, School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies

"20 Generations Short" is a narrative history of economic inequality. It shows how barriers to Black income and wealth creation formed in the colonial era and transformed over 400 years as a bundle of disadvantages relative to white Americans.

Embodying 'Querencia' in the Eastern Arizona and Western New Mexico Borderlands

Vanessa Fonseca-Chávez | Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication

This project engages community histories and stories in eastern Arizona and western New Mexico by examining how "Hispano" (long-standing Spanish- and Mexican-origin) communities created and preserved their "querencia" on both sides of Arizona/New Mexico territorial and state borders.

From China to the USSR: The Return of the 'True' Russians

Laurie Manchester | Associate Professor, School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies

In 1954 100,000 Russians from pious, monarchist families voluntarily repatriated to the Soviet Union.

In Transit: Postwar Journeys of Jewish and Catholic Refugees from Poland (1940s–50s)

Anna Cichopek-Gajraj | Associate Professor, School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies 

This book project examines the postwar displacement of Polish Catholics and Polish Jews.

Literature and Food Sovereignty in Post Celtic Tiger Ireland

Miriam Mara | Associate Professor, School of Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies

Ireland’s geographical status as an island located across physical boundaries of water from mainland Europe in addition to national boundaries has profound effects on the ways agricultural guidelines will inflect the land and its use.

Utopia in Translation: Literature, Travel and Encounter in Early Modern East Asia

William Hedberg | Assistant Professor, School of International Letters and Cultures

This project centers on the literary representation of “utopia” in early modern and modern East Asian literature, a textual tradition that stretches back to the early seventeenth century that crystallized as a cohesive and consistent theme in the nineteenth and twentieth century. 

2018-19: Urban and Rural
Damming Asia: Japanese Overseas Development and the Reconfiguration of the Urban and Rural from the Colonial to the Post-Colonial Era

Aaron Moore | Associate Professor, School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies 

Damming Asia examines the history of Japan’s overseas dam construction and the reconfiguration of the rural and urban in various Asian nations from the age of Japanese imperialism before 1945 to the post-war era when Japan became a global overseas development power.

Feminista Frequencies: Chicana/o Community Radio Archive

Monica De La Torre | Assistant Professor | School of Transborder Studies

Feminista Frequencies: Chicana Radio Activism in Community Broadcasting is a book and online public archive that unearths a remarkable history of Chicanas and Chicanos who were architects of community radio stations as producers, on-air announcers, station managers, tech

Towards “Total Revolution”: Insights from the Bodhgaya land struggle of the late 1970s in Eastern India

Indulata Prasad | Assistant Professor | School of Social Transformation

The Bodhgaya land movement that resulted in Dalits (former untouchables) and women, securing rights to agricultural land, offers a unique and compelling backdrop to examine the socio-spatial transformations in rural Bihar through ‘peaceful’ means.

Hopi Migration Stories: Uncovering the Legacy of the 1956 Indian Relocation Act on Hopi Identity and Sense of Belonging

Angela A. Gonzales | Associate Professor | School of Social Transformation

Beginning in the 1930s, Hopis began migrating to urban centers when the U.S.

Reclaiming the City: Art, Policy and Resistance in Urban Space

Johanna K. Taylor | Assistant Professor, The Design School, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts

Cities are places of contestation and negotiation, where residents navigate policy structures defining urban space to establish their daily lives.

Salmon Wars on the Klamath River: Stories of Activism, Culture, and Resilience

Myla Vicenti Carpio | Associate Professor | Director of Graduate Studies | American Indian Studies

“Salmon Wars on the Klamath River: Stories of Activism, Culture, and Resilience” focuses on the fight for fishing rights (using traditional gill nets) on the Klamath River in the 1960’s and 1970s. Three neighboring Indian nations in rural northern California, the Y

2017-18: Health
Affect, Place and Health Among Asian Immigrants

Karen Leong, Associate Professor, Asian and Pacific American Studies & Women and Gender Studies, School of Social Transformation
Kathy Nakagawa, Associate Professor, Asian and Pacific American Studies, School of Social Transformation
Aggie Noah, Associate Professor, Asian and Pacific American Studies & Justice and Social Inquiry, School of Social Transformation

The World Health Organization (WHO) clearly defines health as a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being rather than as the absence of sickness or frailty (WHO 1948).

Immovable Bodies: Women Writing Health and Disease in the British Romantic Era

Annika Mann, Assistant Professor of English, School of Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies

My book project, Immovable Bodies: Women Writing Health and Disease in the British Romantic Era, posits that British women writers during the Romantic period (1780-1832) resist the universalizing, transdisciplinary claims of both medicine and poetics of this same perio

Integrative Health and Human Well-Being

Tyler DesRoches, Assistant Professor, School of Sustainability
Christopher Wharton, Associate Professor, School of Nutrition and Health Promotion

Philosophers have long argued over the relationship between health and human well-being.

The Barbershop Stories: Narratives of Health and Illness of African American Men in the Black Barbershop

Olga Davis, Professor, Hugh Downs School of Human Communication

The lived experience of African American men and the prominence of the Black Barbershop in African American culture, together offer a unique and compelling backdrop for examining discourses of health in Black communities.

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2019-2020: Borders and Boundaries

Disciplinary, spatial, ideological, virtual—the boundaries we imagine, construct, and confront are multiple and multi-faceted.

2018-19: Urban and Rural

As long as there have been cities, they have existed in complex relationship to the countryside; bound together in networks of trade and migration, politics and warfare, they have also been pitted against each other.

2017-18: Health

What is health and what is disease? What institutions generate or impede health? Who has access to the healthiest environments and what makes those environments healthy? How do communities construct, maintain or discipline health in individual bodies?

2016-17: Money

Money--what it is, how it works, who has it and who doesn’t--has concerned thinkers and researchers both inside and outside academia, and across a wide range of disciplines.

2015-2016 Fellows Theme: Monsters and Monstrosity

The word ‘monster’ derives from the Latin monstrum, meaning “something marvelous;” and ultimately from the verb monere, “to show and to warn.” In coordination with the multi-year celebration of the bicentennial of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, the IHR fellows program for the 2015-2016 academic yea

2014-2015: Affect and Reason

Humanists have been central to reconsidering the active role that emotions play in the constructions of reason, truth, subjectivity and narrative.

2013-2014: The Humanities and Home

When Dorothy Gale utters the last line of The Wizard of Oz, “There’s no place like home,” there seems little doubt that she speaks out of her joy at being safely ensconced on her family’s farm in America’s Heartland.

2012-2013: The Humanities and the Imagination/Imaginary

Now that the Enlightenment dream of generating perfectly rational human persons and utterly transparent social relations has crumbled, the humanities’ focus on human imaginary processes has become increasingly important. But the human imagination is a double-edged sword.

2011-2012: The Humanities and Immigration, Migration, and Movement

The purpose of the 2011-12 Institute for Humanities Research Fellowship is to engage humanities scholars from various disciplines in addressing and analyzing the role of the humanities in illuminating the interrelated concepts of immigration, migration, and movement, broadly conceived.

2010-2011: The Humanities and Human Origins

The purpose of the 2010-11 Institute for Humanities Research fellows theme is to engage humanities scholars from various disciplines in addressing and analyzing the role of the humanities in illuminating—and possibly enriching scientific inquiry into—human origins.

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